Sunday, March 8, 2009

Night Final Assessment - Due on Monday, March 16th, 2009

Your argumentative paper topic is as follows: Would you rather be a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps? Thanks Brandon Harris for a great question. You must use at least three quotes from Night to support your answer. The audience/reader is someone who has not made up his mind on an issue.

The Steps to Follow In Order to Finish the Project:

  1. Choose a topic and stance.
  2. Produce three supporting reasons for the stance
  3. Rank them from weakest to strongest
  4. Produce an opposing argument that will be answered by the strongest argument
  5. Type response, put your name and class period in the post, and post below.

Below is the format for this paper.
I. Introduction

a. Tell us the topic; why is it important – Fill in here
b. State stance, “should/should not” statement – Fill in here
c. Briefly state the supports for the argument; state arguments – Fill in here

II. Weakest argument
a. Sentence one; tell us the topic – Fill in here
b. Sentence two; introduce the information – Fill in here
c. Sentence three; give the information – Fill in here

III. Middle argument
a. Sentence one; tell us the topic – Fill in here
b. Sentence two; introduce the information – Fill in here
c. Sentence three; give the information – Fill in here

IV. Fulcrum
a. State the opposition’s stance (one sentence) – ``The opposition states’’- Fill in here
b. Strongest argument – ``however’’; then tell us the topic - Fill in here
c. Sentence two; introduce the information – Fill in here
d. Sentence three; give the information – Fill in here

V. Conclusion – Begin with: “In conclusion,” - Fill in here

Guidelines:
This paper will consist of 14 sentences: three each in the first three paragraphs, four in the fourth, and one in the fifth

Paragraph one, sentence one – introduces the topic
Paragraph one, sentence two – Clear, direct statement of the stance on the issue
Paragraph one, sentence three – Mentions, but does not explain, the three supporting reasons for the stance

Paragraph two, sentence one, two, and three – the weakest or third-best support is explained

Paragraph three, sentences one, two, and three – Middle (second-best) support is explained

Paragraph four – The purpose of this (the most important) paragraph is to increase our credibility by recognizing (briefly – one sentence) the opposition with our strongest argument.

  • Paragraph four, sentence one – Should begin with the words ``The opposition states’’ so that the reader clearly recognizes that the argument in this sentence is not one that the writer is giving as one of his own. The opposition argument must be a legitimate one but does not have to be the opposition’s strongest argument.
  • Paragraph four, sentence two – This sentence must begin with the word ``however,’’ to change the direction and bring the reader back to the writer’s general argument.
  • Paragraph four, sentence two, three, and four – These sentences contain the writer’s strongest supporting argument. The points must directly address the opposition’s argument in sentence one.

Paragraph five, sentence one – Use this as a one-sentence conclusion. Begin with ``In conclusion.’’ A writer can restate Paragraph one, sentence two here in different words. Be sure to avoid going beyond one sentence – if the writer has effectively stated his or her case, there is no need for further summary. Do not introduce any new information.

85 comments:

  1. Mitch Eichler
    12

    Merriam-Webster’s defines mass genocide as the deliberate and systematic destruction of a racial, political, or cultural group, but Adolf Hitler and his followers gave a new meaning to the word. Being a Jew held in a concentration camp would be more preferable than being a German officer. Although, life was better for officers, it was an inhumane occupation.

    The German officers had to be strict with the prisoners regardless of whether they wanted to. They couldn’t be passive or they would lose the fear instilled in the Jews; therefore they had no choice in the matter; if the people were to be compassionate, they would have to do it in secret like the doctor (Wiesel 75). The necessity of instilling fear was shown when Idek was caught with the Polish girl and was forced to take action against Elie (Wiesel 54).

    Unnecessary killing, especially mass genocide, is unacceptable in all forms. Although about six million Jews were murdered, over ten million people, total, died and the lives lost can truly never be avenged or restored. One of the most devastating parts was how not only the killings, but the treatment of the corpses did not affect the Nazis (Wiesel 26).

    The opposition states that the German officers had no choice in what they did because they did it to save their own lives. However, the Germans well knew what the fate of the Jews would be and ranked themselves higher in priority than perfectly innocent civilians. They also may state that one person wouldn’t have made a difference, but so many officers chose to be selfish that it would have made a difference. Even if the officers were not the ones unleashing the gas, and even if they didn’t want to work for Hitler, they were still, and always will be murderers.

    In conclusion, the Holocaust was one of the darkest hours of history; over six million Jews, homosexuals, gypsies and non-Aryans were killed, therefore; it is our duty to learn about them, their stories, and the abomination that took place under Adolf Hitler’s totalitarian regime.

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  2. Jocey Spitz- 12th period

    The Holocaust was an important part of history that should never be forgotten because Hitler killed and tortured millions of innocent people. If I were a part of the Holocaust, I would like to be a Jewish prisoner. Being a Jewish prisoner would be the better position because Jews will never be able to regret any actions, Jews will now value life and the act the German soldiers performed was inhumane.
    Looking back at the killing done at the concentration camps, Germans probably realize their acts were wrong. Jewish prisoners were the ones being killed and tortured; therefore they aren’t sorry or have regret. In the book Night, the SS are trained to have hatred against the Jews, so they are able to kill them any way possible (Wiesel 22).
    To live as a Jew during the Holocaust, and survive, is not common. Today people believe that money is the only important thing in life, when really we are taking everything we have for granite. Just to have a little bit of food and water and being alive was an amazing feeling to the prisoners at Auschwitz. In Night, Elie Wiesel, the author, writes, “You must resist death. Don’t lose faith in yourself, or in your life.”(Wiesel 97).
    The opposition states that it would be better to be a German soldier, if you had to be involved with World War II. However what the German soldiers did to the Jewish people was profoundly inhumane. How could one human burn, suffocate, drown, or beat multiple humans without feeling disgusted for their actions? The novel Night written by Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor, states, “After a long moment of waiting, the executioner put the rope around his neck…they had completed their task” (Wiesel 59-60).
    In conclusion, being a Jewish prisoner would be the better position because they are innocent people, have a good perspective on life, and did not perform inhumane behavior.

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  3. Cheyenne Lukstein 1°

    The Holocaust was a devastating event that will never be forgotten. I would favor being a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp then a German soldier. The Germans, striving on the fear of the Jews, lost their souls while slaughtering millions of innocent people.
    During the Holocaust, the Jewish people kept hope for each other and themselves. They kept optimism of which they would make it another day and never grant the Germans with triumph. I began to laugh. I was happy. I felt like kissing him (Wiesel 72).
    The German’s endeavored upon the Jew’s fear for them. Germans were focused on fulfilling their needs and if a Jew got in the way, they were beaten or killed. The officer came closer and shouted to him to be silent. But my father didn’t hear. He continued to call me. The officer wielded his club and dealt him a violent blow to the head (Wiesel 111).
    The opposition states that they’d rather live as a German soldier then be tortured to death as a Jew. However, the Jewish people kept their faith in God and their entrance into heaven during this catastrophic time. Though Jews were dying by the minute, they still prayed to God and continued to trust in his ways. When the selection came, he was doomed by the start, offering his neck to the executioner, as it were. All he asked of us was: “In three days, I’ll be gone… Say Kaddish for me.” (Wiesel 77)
    In conclusion, I’d rather loose my life as a Jew in a concentration camp then take the lives of a million others as a soulless and disrespected German soldier.

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  4. Julie Bastulli
    10th period

    Choosing between being a German soldier or a Jewish prisoner during the Holocaust is a difficult decision. I choose to be a Jewish prisoner for a few reasons that to me makes it better than being a soldier. One, watching while people die, two, not being able to help, and three, having to participate in the killing.

    Having to participate in the killing of all those innocent people would be really hard. The S.S. Officers said to all Elie and his father, “Do you see those flames? Over there- that’s where you are going to be taken. That’s your grave.” (Wiesel 28) Having to give people that news has the potential to tear a person apart and also to watch them die as a prisoner would be heart wrenching.

    Standing on the side and watching while millions separated and some march to their death in the gas chambers. The S.S. Officers announced to the newly arrived Jews, “Men to the left! Women to the right!” (Wiesel 27) all of the women and children don’t have a chance as they go to the right, even those who go to the left are as good as gone and all the soldiers do is watch.

    The opposition states that the soldiers were better off and couldn’t be botherd with the prisoners. However, some of the soldiers could have gone against and helped. One of the S.S. Soldiers told the prisoners before the selection, “I hope you all succeed in getting through but you must help your own chances. Before you get to the next room do something that will give you some color.” (Wiesel 67) not many of the soldiers acted this way out of fear for their own lives. Here it would be better to be a Jewish prisoner because they gave each other the strength to carry on through.

    In conclusion, it would be better to be a Jewish prisoner because you wouldn’t have to live with the guilt of taking all of those lives during the Holocaust.

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  5. Luke "LMK" K 1st period


    The Holocaust was a tragic but important incident that happened in the world and should never be forgotten so we don’t make the same mistake again. All the poor killed and tortured innocent people was a inhumane act of insanity. If I were a part of the Holocaust and had to choose a side, I would choose to be a Jewish prisoner. Being a Jewish person would better because they wouldn’t be held responsible for that evil act as well remember for doing such a cruel thing, while preferably being the German soldiers, they would have it a lot easier but still be labeled for committing such a crime as well as receiving a punishment but it was still an unimaginable job for them to do.
    The killing, torturing and treatment of them, especially in such huge numbers, isn’t right or humane. Roughly six million innocent Jewish people were murdered and about ten million people-total- were killed all together. The worst is all the lives lost cant be revived or known what their futures and faiths were. As well as all of the horrible things they experienced and saw there, the only thing we have left is word from people who witnessed it first hand. I think the oddest thing about the killings, treatment and torture and the treatment of the Jewish people didn’t affect the Nazis emotions or even feel sympathetic for them (Wiesel 26).
    To live as a Jew during the Holocaust had to be a very scary feeling, and survive, is a very rare thing. Now a days people over look such things we have for granite such as education, laws to protect you, technology to save you and others as well as everything else important to us. While as prisoners at Auschwitz it taken for granite if you had some food and water to spare and live off of let alone still be alive. In Night, Elie Wiesel- the author, says, “You must resist death. Don’t lose faith in yourself, or in your life.” Which I think summarizes what all the Jewish prisoners were thinking trying to stay alive. (Wiesel 97).
    The Germans knew what was going to happen to the Jews, and instead of putting an end to it put themselves over the Jews to spare their lives instead of both of theirs. It seems like 10 million lives didn’t make a difference in the eyes of one Nazi, they were too selfish to prevent it. Even if they didn’t want to do it they still did labeling them criminals for life. The killing done at the concentration camps, the Nazis probably realized how wrong what they were doing was, not having regret or sorrow for them. While the Jewish had to accept it and live only with scarred memories. In Night, the SS soldiers were trained to hate Jewish, so they didn’t show any sympathy towards them while they were killing them in the most horrible ways possible (Wiesel 22).
    In conclusion, being a Jewish prisoner would be the better position because they are innocent people, have a good perspective on life, and did not perform any evil acts against anyone, while still suffering and dying horribly it was the one way to show they were loving people. While the Germans had an easier way of life at the time, it would soon be filled with hatred and discuss for their insane acts of cruelty.

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  6. Katilyn Glover - 12th period

    The Holocaust is a very important event where millions of innocent people were killed because of what they belive in. If you were in the Holocaust you should be a Jewish Prisoner in the concentration camps. This is because you would be able to stand up for what you belive in, you would not have to act inhumane, and you would have the possibilty of staying with loved ones.
    One reason is that you would have the possibilty of staying with loved ones. Many Jewish prisoners did not get to stay with them because of their age or they were incapable of working but, some were lucky and were able to stay with their loved ones until they died or if they were able to escape. An example is from the novel Night by Elie Wiesel when he was waiting for his father to be selected and he thought that if he were sent to the right that he would go after him and save him.(Wiesel 29)
    Another reason is that you would not have to act inhumane. If you were to be a German solider you would have to beat, burn, or gas the Jewish prisoners because of your orders but, if you were the Jewish prisoner you would have a your head held up high because you fif not have to hurt anybody in the process. In the book night Elie's father was stuck by a Gypsie which happen to work for a the Nazi and ahe sturck him many times while Elie was watching. (Wiesel 36-37)
    The opposition states that being a German soldier would be better because you would have a chance of living. However if you were a Jew you would be able to stand up for what you believe in which many Jews did not have a chance to do because they were killed right of the bat. When Juliek played Beethoven on his violin right before he died showed that he did what he belived in. (Wiesel 90)
    In conculsion being a Jewish prisoner would make you a better person if you were to survive the Holocaust and you would never forget.

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  7. Katy L.
    Period 10

    The decision to be a German soldier or a Jewish prisoner is important because it forces you to think more about each lifestyle and their roles in the Holocaust. Being a German soldier would be better than being a Jewish prisoner in this situation. German soldiers had life, liberty, and happiness.

    Today, almost everybody has some kind of happiness in their lives, just as the German soldiers had. Idek had a secret affair with a Polish girl and had love and happiness even at the worst of times (Wiesel, 56). German soldiers were able to be content and had no one to tell them of their wrong doings.

    Liberty, another right we have today is something the German soldiers had that the Jews did not. Jews were treated as dogs and as a result, were not treated well at all and had a very short leash (Wiesel, 22). Jews were not only confined to a small area, they were forced to do unbearable things while the Germans just sat amused, and careless (Wiesel, 92).

    The opposition states the Jews had their faith and life as well. However, in reality the Jewish prisoners weren’t in control of their own life at the time, and in those situations faith and hope could only get you so far, prisoners were even asking where God was in their time of need (Wiesel, 62). The Germans had family to go back home to, and food on their table, they had a life. Perhaps the definition of life is not of items, but of existence, but Germans were convinced, Jews did not, and should not exist.

    In conclusion, because the Jews lived off of pain and cruelty, it wouldn’t make sense to prefer being a Jewish prisoner over a German soldier, there aren’t any reasons for wanting to endure the pain those innocent people went through.

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  8. Luke Siko
    3/15/09
    Honors English 1st Period
    Night Final Assessment


    The holocaust was the mass genocide carried out mostly by Germans that resulted in the death of countless Jews, homosexuals, and gypsies. I would rather be a Jewish prisoner than a German soldier. The main reasons for this are that I would not feel guilty, I would learn how valuable life really is, and I would be able to live with myself.

    One reason that I would rather be a Jewish prisoner than a German soldier is because I would realize how important life is and know the value of life. In Wiesel’s experience he mentioned that the soldiers would hang prisoners, one of which was a child, in front of all of the blocks (Wiesel 62). If I was a Jewish prisoner I would realize that none of the prisoners deserve to die and how much life really matters.

    Another reason I would rather be a Jew is because I would not feel guilty at all. Most of the Jews in the camps had not committed any crimes to the Germans, innocent babies were being killed (Wiesel 32). I would not feel guilty because I would have never done anything wrong to deserve this treatment.

    The opposition states that it would have been better to be a German soldier because you most likely would have most likely survived despite their outrageously cruel behavior (Wiesel 29-34). However, could you deal with committing the horrible inhumane deeds the German soldiers committed? My final reason that I would rather be a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp than a German soldier is because I would be able to live with my conscience. If I was a German soldier I would be able to handle being responsible for over 6 million or more human deaths; I would rather have a clean conscience and die than be a German soldier in the Holocaust.

    In conclusion I would rather be a Jewish prisoner than a German soldier because I would not feel guilty, I would learn how valuable life really is, and I would be able to live with my conscience.

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  9. Daniel Ward
    Thursday, March 12, 2009 2:55:18 PM
    Night Essay 1st period

    The question I have been asked is: Would you rather be a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps? And I have come up with this answer: I would rather be a Jewish person in a concentration camp than a German soldier. I say this for three reasons: respect, having to kill people, and life.

    Respect is an easy thing to lose and a hard thing to gain. If you were a German soldier in the Holocaust you would have no respect whatsoever because you helped kill almost an entire religion. And if you were a Jewish survivor of the Holocaust you would everyone’s respect because you avoided death and lived through one of the most terrible events that has occurred to mankind. If you were a Holocaust survivor we will always have respect for you and we will never forget. Elie Wiesel a survivor of the Holocaust received a Nobel peace prize for his bravery and every one had respect for him (Wiesel 117).

    My second reason for preferring to be a Jewish prisoner is that if you were a German soldier you would have to kill people. I couldn’t do it at all, I could not kill people and that’s final. I don’t know how the German soldiers could live with themselves. I not last long as German soldier because I would have to kill people so that’s also why I would be a Jewish prisoner. Elie Wiesel a survivor of the Holocaust says that he will never forget the first day he saw the Germans kill people (Wiesel 34).

    The opposition states that it would be fine to kill people because if you were a German soldier in the Holocaust you were most likely forced to kill the Jewish. However I believe that no matter what the situation it is still wrong to kill someone. Life is precious and you should live it to the fullest, I could never extinguish the light which is life. That is my final reason for preferring to be a Jewish prisoner in the Holocaust. Elie Wiesel a survivor of the Holocaust says that when his father died while they both were in the concentration camp he felt like that there was nothing to live for anymore (Wiesel 112).

    In conclusion I would be a Jewish prisoner rather than a German soldier in the Holocaust which was one of the most terrible events to occur to human kind. We will never forget what happened to the people who died in the Death camps and Labor camps. We will never forget.

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  10. Jessica
    Gregory
    1st period
    Would you rather be a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps? I would prefer to be a Jewish prisoner in concentration camps than a German officer because being and officer would just be too inhumane for me to ever be. Even tough being a prisoner would quite painful and I would most likely not survive. The Germans’ were probably used to killing so many people at the end of war, the innocent Jewish people were treated horribly, and the mass killings of people.
    The Germans probably knew that what they were doing, killing millions of innocent people and children, they knew that it was wrong and probably at first it was hard to do but, after time worn on they probably stopped thinking twice about it and killed them aimlessly. “There are eighty of you in this wagon,” added the German officer. “If anyone is missing, you’ll all be shot, like dogs…” (Wiesel 22).
    The SS officers put fear into the prisoners so they would not dare to fight back or question them, so that way they would be easier to order around and do humiliating things to them and not worry about themselves. For example in the book, where Elie punished for seeing Idek with a young polish girl, Elie had to lie over a box and be whipped in front of everybody to show that he did something wrong and if anybody else did something wrong they would get the same thing (Wiesel 54-56).
    The opposition states that the German soldiers lived in high society and that they were forced to kill millions of innocent people. Like when they tortured the pipel of Oberkapo of sabotage, they had no real evidence but they still killed him and he was always a kind person to al they people (Wiesel 60-62). However, after the war some lived out their life while others were killed and captured by the Russians. Some were tortured and killed by the Jewish people that they had once tortured themselves (Gita Frankel, holocaust survivor).
    In conclusion, I would still chose to be a Jewish prisoner in the holocaust because I would not want to be German officer killing millions of innocent people just because of their religion.

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  11. Dan Christmyer- 12th period

    Given the choice, would you rather be a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp, or live the high society lifestyle of the German soldier? Personally, I would choose the honorable life of the Jewish prisoner. Religious convictions, pride in my family heritage, and conscience and integrity would dictate my decision.
    I arrived at my decision based first of all on Religious Convictions. In Night, Elie says, "I did not deny God's existence, but I doubted His absolute justice." (Wiesel 42). Elie never doubted Gods existence, which was one of the main reasons why he survived, and even though many Jewish people did not survived, they maintained their belief in their religion and died for something they believed in.
    Secondly, I chose a Jewish prisoner over a German solider because of the bonds and ties with my family. In the book Night, Elie Wiesel said, "After my father's death, nothing could touch me any more." (Wiesel 107). This experience hurt Elie so deeply that he became numb and emotionless and felt as though nothing else could ever cause him that much pain again.
    The opposition states that it would be much better to live the long and luxurious life of a German solider and not be tortured and killed like many of the Jewish prisoners were. However, would you be able to live your life knowing that you played a part in the killing of approximately 6 million Jewish adults and 1.5 million Jewish children? In Night, Elie says, “Do you see that chimney over there? See it? Do you see those flames? (Yes, we did see the flames.) Over there-that's where you're going to be taken. That's your grave, over there.” (Wiesel 28). This shows what the Germans did to the Jewish, and any sane person would not be able to live with the fact that you were instrumental in the killing of millions of innocent people based on their religious beliefs.
    In conclusion, I would most definitely choose the honorable life of the Jewish prisoner and keep the legacy of my life intact for my family and all of my descendants.

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  12. Alina Wirtz
    Times during WWII were very difficult for Jews, and despite the high-quality lifestyle, difficult for German soldiers. However, I would choose to be a Jewish prisoner. This choice would be the most reasonable because to drive innocent people to their deaths, follow the leadership of someone as cruel as Hitler, or to see people getting tortured by my friends, would be unbearable to experience.
    To have to take orders from Hitler would be like having my role model tell me to kill innocent people. I would always want to retaliate against, or make Hitler stop, but I would never be able to without endangering my loved ones. Like Elie said, “Was there a place where you could no longer be endanger of death?” (Wiesel 37).
    If I was forced into service, so would my family and friends, “here there are no fathers, no brothers, no friends.” (Wiesel 115). The people who had taught me not to hurt someone, would be not only going against their own word, but encouraging me to take part in it. They would want me to ensure my safety and their own, by telling me to go along with Hitler’s plan.
    The opposition states that being a prisoner would mean that I would be tortured to death and betrayed by my own friends. However, having to kill masses of blameless people would rip apart my conscience. I could never yell "Men to the left! Women to the right!" (Wiesel 27). Seeing families being ripped apart and seeing my friends killed by my hand, would be the worst torture I could ever experience.
    In conclusion, being a prisoner would be less of torture than having to be the German soldier doing the torturing.

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  13. Paige G.-1st period

    The Holocaust was from 1933-1945, and is used to describe the genocide of six million European Jews who were part of a program of extermination lead by the Nazi Germany and Adolf Hitler. After what I have learned throughout the book Night, I would rather be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps rather than a German soldier. Although German soldiers were treated better, I would never be able to physically harm someone like the German soldiers did to the Jewish prisoners.
    When the Jewish people came to the concentration camps many were separated from their families. Although many didn’t have any family left, they always had another Jewish prisoner who could relate to them and become family to them. This helped the Jewish prisoners get through the horrific experiences they suffered at the hands of the Germans.
    The Jewish prisoners who were with other members of their family in the concentration camps often had to decide whether or not to save themselves or save their family members in certain situations. In Elie’s case, he had to care for his father and he saw how weak his father was becoming and at one point, while they were in the train going to a different camp, German guards told volunteers to go around and throw out all the dead bodies. When they got to Elie’s father, he didn’t move so they thought he was dead, but Elie screamed “No!” “He’s not dead! Not yet!” (Wiesel 99) Elie tried to keep his father alive as long as he could, until Elie faced the fact that his father could no longer go on and he needed to save himself, not his father.
    The opposition states that it was better to be a German soldier because you didn’t starve or were dehydrated and you weren’t going to be killed, but what the German soldiers did to the Jews was inhumane. The Jews were killed for no reason; they were put in gas chambers, beaten, drowned, hung, or shot. During Night a young boy was hung for collaborating against the Nazi’s and as the Jewish prisoners watched the young boy die, someone asked “For God’s sake, where is God?” and Elie replied “Where He is? This is where-hanging here from this gallows…” (Wiesel 65). Young children were almost killed immediately arriving at the camps or they died of starvation, Elie once said “Never shall I forget the small faces of the children whose bodies I saw transformed into smoke under a silent sky.” (Wiesel 34).
    In conclusion, we should never forget what happened to all of the innocent Jewish people and to learn from the mistakes that Hitler made to try and make everyone the same and only worship him. We also need to make sure this doesn’t happen again. Although there are problems in the Middle East, we need to help those countries and stop any future genocide situations like the Holocaust.

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  14. Ben Sherman 1st period

    The holocaust, a time where an entire race of people where systematically murdered for no reason at all; this is a time where the word genocide got a new meaning. If I was alive during the holocaust I would have prefered to be a Jew in the camps than an officer in charge of one. The actions of the Nazis during the holocaust where inhumane and I couldn’t cause these abominations to be carried out on people.
    I couldn’t have been a German in charge of a camp because I am not a person who delights in the suffering of others. I am not a hard or cruel person. If I was a German in a camp I would do my best to secretly improve the lives of those imprisoned there like the doctor. (Weisel 75)
    I also couldn’t watch as people were starved and then murdered when they became too skinny or too weak. (Weisel 71) What the nazis did was homicidal and evil. They took living human beings and stripped everything they possibly could from them, everything from emotions to physical possessions. (Weisel 28)
    The opposition states the officers had no choice. However they knew what awaited the Jews in Auschwitz and other camps. They knew, and did nothing. Did these officers really believe that they were better or more important than millions of innocent civilians? The Nazis treated the Jews like cattle, nothing more than animals awaiting the slaughter.
    In conclusion I would rather be a prisoner because I wouldn’t have to become a tool of murder.

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  15. Megan Eisaman-12th period
    When asked the question “During World War Two, would you rather be a German officer or a prisoner in a concentration camp?” which would you choose? This question is important because it really shows where your views stand. People should choose to be a prisoner. This is because the Jewish people where there because of there religion. It’s important to choose this side because they people there were dying for what they believe in.
    The Jewish and other people in the concentration camps where not there by choice. They were forced to live there till they died or were released by the Russians. If anyone tried to escape they were shot. (Wiesel 54).
    The German and sometimes even Jewish officers would cruelly brutalize the prisoners. Examples of this is burning or gassing them in a large room, shooting, whipping, or hanging them to death. This brutality was so scary for some people that they killed themselves before the Germans could. (Wiesel 75).
    The opposition states that being a German officer means life. However this also means you were in charge of killing millions of innocent people! Or even watching them simply die of starvation. If I was in charge of something like that I would not be able to live with myself. (Wiesel 97).
    In conclusion, when asked the question “During World War Two, would you rather be a German officer or a prisoner in a concentration camp?” answer with “Prisoner” because they lost there lives because of something they couldn’t control and if they had to go through it why shouldn’t every other religion or belief.

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  16. Erin Umek
    10th period
    Devastating economic crisis in Germany after World War I pushed Adolf Hitler and his army of Nazis to extreme conditions: persecuting over 6 million innocent people who were the “cause of all the country’s troubles”. His blindly loyal followers who ran horrible, unimaginably cruel death camps were called SS officers, and given the choice I would have chosen to be in the camp as a prisoner rather than one of those heartless officers. Their obsessive loyalty to Hitler left them with no choice but to obey under his threats, and their inhuman cruelty left them empty shells of people, mere shadows of we who are designed to love and care for one another.
    These officers were completely loyal to Hitler, and any disobedience would result in death. I am a very opinionated person, and being wholly faithful to one terrible individual would be unbearable. “The Kapos and heads of each block forced everyone to look him full in the face.” (Wiesel 60) says Elie Wiesel, a prisoner and survivor of the Holocaust, of the cruel individuals who ran the camps and made the prisoners stare into the faces of their dead companions.
    Another reason I would choose to be a prisoner in the camps is because many of the prisoners were there because of their belief in the Jewish faith, while most of the officers were there out of fear for their lives, not true belief in everything Hitler wanted. Even much of the foreign world was afraid to take action, upon entering the first camp Elie’s father said “Humanity? Humanity is not concerned with us. Today, anything is allowed. Anything is possible, even those crematories” (Wiesel, 30)
    The opposition states that being a German soldier would be best because there would be little to no chance of death in these camps, and self-preservation is in fact a human instinct. However, I wouldn’t kill millions of people in fear of my one life, and being a Jew in the prisons would be a more honorable way to spend your last moments. I would not be able to kill one person; I can’t even imagine being a part of one of the largest genocides in history. Personally, I would rather die an innocent person than live as the one responsible for their death.
    In conclusion, I would prefer to be a Jew in the prisons rather than be an officer herding them to their painful deaths, we must prevent this from happening again; we must believe those who warn us, like Elie’s mentor Moshe the Beadle tearfully said “They take me for a madman” (Wiesel 5) we must learn to hear the cry of those in need and join the side of justice, and place others first.

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  17. Abbie Fox: 10th Period
    The Holocaust is a very important part of our world’s history because it was a time when millions of people were killed for no reason and were treated very terribly. If I had lived back when the Holocaust was going on, I would choose to be a Jewish prisoner. I would want to be a Jewish prisoner because I couldn’t handle being a German soldier, killing people as if I had no care in the world and making the Jews feel so badly that some even stopped believing in God.
    If Germans were to reflect back on their actions in the past, some would regret what they have done and some would still believe that it was the right thing to do. All of the Germans should regret their choice on what they did, but for some once they heard Adolf Hitler’s ideas, they started to use and follow his methods of politics which they should regret because it hurt them also by killing off people who didn’t even do anything wrong. Elie Wiesel, the man who wrote Night says, “It was simply a matter of helping oneself, and open tomb.” (Wiesel 15).
    Killing people of all ages, especially in that high of quantity, is a terrible action in every way. Six million Jews and even more people of all different beliefs and religions have died and there is really no possible way those numbers of special lives will ever come back into the human race. Elie Wiesel, a man who had experienced the Holocaust once said, “After my father’s death, nothing could touch me anymore.” (Wiesel 107).
    The opposition states that the Germans chose to be an officer so that they could save their own lives and not have to go through any concentration camps. However, the Germans knew that being a soldier meant that they were in a higher rank and that they were going to have to treat the people in the concentration camps with a lot of hatred. The author of Night, Elie Wiesel experienced, “Faster! Faster! Get on with you lazy swine!” (Wiesel 17). Even if some German soldiers weren’t necessarily the ones throwing people in the crematory or always yelling at the Jews, they still followed Hitler’s ways and can never take that back.
    In conclusion, choosing to be a Jewish prisoner is the better option because they weren’t the ones hurting others and everyone who had been through the concentration camps is now and always will be known as a brave, strong human being.

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  18. Max Kisselle
    10th Period

    The evil dictator of Germany, Hitler, committed mass, prejudiced, murder during WW2. If the holocaust happened in my time, i'd rather be a Jewish prisoner than a German soldier. I say this simply because i don't have the heart to be able to kill innocent people or make the decisions those Germans made during the war. "'What can we expect? It's war....'" (Wiesel 4).
    Germans made an absolutely horrible mistake in that time period by killing innocent Jews, blacks, and all others who didn't match Hitler's Aryan profile. Killing innocent people was an absolutely terrible and unforgivable crime committed by Hitler and his men. By killing these people, Hitler and the Germans marked Germany as an "evil" country. "Was there a single place here where you were not in danger of death?"(Wiesel 37).
    Jews in the Holocaust were usually very innocent and un-deserving of the punishment the Germans doled out. The Germans came and took the Jews out of their homes, promising new land and more work. When the Jews got to their new destination, the Germans sent them to work and concentration camps where they were put to work and killed."Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp, which has turned my life into one long night"(Wiesel 32).
    The opposition states that they would rather be a German soldier because they would not die. However, you would still go to jail or be put to the death after the war. Also, having the killing of innocents on your conscious would be torture as is. Also, if you didn't do something right, Hitler would also have you dead.
    In conclusion, being an innocent Jew would be better because you would die for your faith, you wouldn't have the killing of innocents on your conscious, and if you made it out alive, you could spread the word and keep the story alive.

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  19. Amanda Harley 12th period
    The Holocaust was a terrible time in history when the Nazi regime and its collaborators murdered approximately six million Jews. In my opinion, being a Jew in a concentration camp would be more preferable than being a German soldier. Even though Jews went through an incredible amount of suffering and hardships, I don’t think I could handle causing the pain among the innocent Jews.
    The German officers had an incredibly horrible job. Day after day the SS officers were forced to abuse and kill the Jews. The SS officers were trained to kill Jews in what ever manner they pleased; whether it was burning them, beating them, shooting them or starving them, there were countless ways the officers tortured the Jews. (Wiesel 26)
    While at concentration camps not only did the Jews have to suffer from pain and starvation, but they were separated from their loved ones. SS officers would carelessly rip children out of their mothers’ arms and throw them into the fire to be burned alive. Elie Wiesel, the author of Night writes “Never shall I forget the little faces of the children, whose bodies I saw turned into wreaths of smoke beneath a silent blue sky.” (Wiesel 32)
    The opposition states that life at a concentration camp was better as a German soldier because they did not have to suffer like the Jews did. However, although the Germans may not have been starved or beaten like the Jews were, they were the ones torturing the Jews. Somehow the Germans seemed to put aside the fact that Jews were people just like them when they were maliciously attacking them. When Elie’s father was dying and crying out for a glass of water, a SS officer told him to be quiet but Elie’s father did not hear him and continued to cry, so the officer dealt him a violent blow on the head with his truncheon. (Wiesel 106)
    In conclusion, if I had to choose between being a Jew or a German soldier, I would choose a Jew because they were good, innocent people who sadly were forced to suffer under the ruthless Nazis.

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  20. Michael Curtis-6/7 period

    The Holocaust was a major and devastating event in which Hitler and other Germans killed and tortured millions of Jews and others. If I had to go through the holocaust I would prefer to be a German. A lot more Germans survived and didn’t have to go through years of torture.

    At the end of the Holocaust the Russians defeated the Germans and liberated the remaining Jews in the concentration camps. Unlike the Jews when the Germans were defeated they were not all killed or tortured or kept in concentration camps. More Germans survived the Holocaust along with most of their families.

    In the camps the Germans were not tortured and they afterward they did not have as bad of an emotional and mental effect as the Jews. “From the depths of the mirror, a corpse was contemplating me. The look in his eyes as he gazed at me has never left me.”(Wiesel 115) shows the effect the Holocaust had on the surviving Jews and the fear and memories they had to live with for the rest of their lives. “I no longer felt anything except the lashes of the whip.”(Wiesel 57) illustrates the torture the Jews suffered and that the Germans never had to experience.

    The opposition states that what all the Germans were doing where inhumane. However, not all the Germans killed Jew and tortured them without mercy. Some of the Germans had pity on the Jew and tried to help sometimes. “All right. Your father will work here, next to you.”(Wiesel 50) proves that not all Germans were inhumane and some like this German officer allowed family to be together and work together.

    In conclusion, being a German officer would be better way to live because not as many were tortured, killed and not all of them were inhumane.

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  21. Megan Shrock
    period 1

    Many Jews were tortured and killed during the Holocaust, which is why it is one of the most important events in history and should never be repeated. In a concentration camp, I would’ve rather been a Jewish prisoner rather than a German soldier. I believe that although the Jews were treated poorly, they had it better because the job of a German soldier was nowhere near moral.
    All throughout a Jewish prisoners experience in a concentration camp, there was rarely a point that they knew what was going to happen next. The Jews could be brave and courageous because they didn’t know what was going to happen to them next, if I knew I was going to die, I would be scared and not live my life in optimism to the very end. In the book Night by Elie Wiesel, an SS officer told the Jews that they should’ve killed themselves rather than go out there and that he was surprised that they didn’t know what was in store for them (Wiesel 30).
    The German’s actions during the Holocaust were inhumane, therefore they probably regret following Hitler. The German’s knew many ways to kill people and never took a step back and looked at what they were really doing to these people when they tortured them. At one point in the book, Idek finds Elie’s father slacking off and doesn’t hesitate to beat him with an iron bar (Wiesel 54).
    The opposition states that killing would be better then being killed. However, I believe that living after killing someone would be equivalent or worse then being dead. Some Germans decided they couldn’t live with that kind of guilt, so they would help the Jews. When Elie had to go to the hospital, the doctor gave him advice on what he had to do to have the greatest chance of surviving (Wiesel 74).
    In conclusion, A German soldier would have been better off being a Jewish prisoner in the long run because they just live their life as innocent people and they wouldn’t have the bag of guilt following them for the rest of their lives.

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  22. Danny Robinson 1st period


    In Hitler’s eyes, the Holocaust was something that was necessary to gain power control, and rid Germany of the Jewish, people he considered to be subhuman. If I had a choice, I would rather be a German soldier during the Holocaust. Surviving, being respected and knowing that what you were doing was an order and not something that you wanted to do.
    Being respected during the Holocaust was reserved for the officers of the German Army. The German officers had to keep the Jews in line and made the Jews respect them, even if that meant punishing them. Elie had to respect Idek in the camp because Idek was Elie’s Kapo and he had to follow his orders, even if that meant beating (Wiesel 57).
    Hitler was the man responsible for the Holocaust and he gave his soldiers the orders to commit harm to the Jewish population. The orders were to raid and kill people of Jewish towns. This is seen when German soldiers first enter the towns near Elie’s home (Wiesel 9).
    The opposition states that the Germans did not care if the Jews lived or died, and that the Germans were inconsiderate, killing monsters. However, what the Germans did care about was being able to live. Surviving was what the German soldiers wanted the most because they were just as ordinary as the Jews, in that they also had families that they cared about and wanted to get back to and not all of the soldiers were selfish. Not all of the soldiers wanted to kill the Jews because they knew it was wrong (Wiesel 10).
    In conclusion, my stance on the topic of member of the Holocaust stands as a German officer because if you were a soldier, you would get to survive through the war and see your family again.

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  23. Brandon Harris- 1st period

    The dark memories of the Holocaust reminds us of all the terrible things the Nazi’s did to try to obliterate the existence of Jews and it shows how many German’s were so cold blooded that they enjoyed seeing Jews suffer and die by the millions (Wiesel 53). With that being said I would rather be a Jew in a concentration camp. At least the Jewish population was not fighting in a war with the wrong morals, they were dieing for a cause they believed in, and they did not have to live the rest of their lives like many German soldiers saying we killed millions of people for no just reason.
    In World War II Germans were fighting in the war so they could achieve world domination. Many German citizens and soldiers knew the war was wrong but as long as there was food they could tolerate the war. At least the Jews were kept from entering the war to fight for a cause that was completely absurd.
    Jews had no choice whether they wanted to go to a concentration camp or not because they were forced to go due to their religious beliefs (Wiesel entire book). The Jewish population was dieing because the Nazi’s and Hitler discriminated Jews. But Jews always knew that they were not dieing for any crime or wrong doing, they were dieing for a cause in which they were not at fault and a cause they strongly believed in (Wiesel 62).
    The opposition states the mass extermination of the Jewish population was just part of the war and the German soldiers were just following orders and should not feel guilty. However, how could one live knowing they alone had killed hundreds or thousands of innocent people? This was not a part of the war, it was a dictators evil decision to blame all his war woes on a religious group. Every soldier knew deep in their heart that what they were doing was beyond irrational and they knew they had the choice to make right decisions but, many German soldiers (though not every soldier like the Oberkapo of the 52nd Cable Kommando) went along with the flow and killed as ordered(Wiesel 63-64).
    In conclusion, starving and dieing in a concentration camp is much more appealing to me than killing for a reason that is unwarranted.

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  24. Drew Schillinger
    Honors English 6/7

    In the book “Night” by Elie Wiesel you could either identify with being a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps. If I were to choose I would choose to go through the hardships that the Jewish people experienced in the concentration camps. The things I would learn, gain and not have to live with would be why I chose to be a Jew in the holocaust.
    While having to deal with the torture committed on me by the Germans, I would build loyalty in my Jewish heritage. In the quote “Bite your lip, little brother……keep your anger and hatred for another day, for later on. The day will come, but not now….wait. Grit your teeth and wait…” (Weisel 51) is an example of how the Jews must band together to later overcome the atrocities the Germans inflicted upon them. With this union-like manner, the Jewish people learned to bond together because of their heritage and the pain they went through together.
    “What doesn’t kill you, makes you stronger” would be a good quote to describe what you would gain from going through a concentration camp. The quote “we were masters of nature, masters of the world. We had forgotten everything – death, fatigue, our natural needs. Stronger than cold or hunger. Stronger than the shots and the desire to die, condemned and wandering; mere numbers, we were the only men on earth”(Weisel 83) describes how the Jews thought of themselves during their hardship. Begin rejected because of their faith, the Jewish people gained courage and lost site of fear.
    The opposition’s stance is to be the German soldier. However being a prisoner, you would not have to live with the burden of being a murderer like the German soldiers were. With the statement, “How could it be possible for them to burn people, children and for the world to keep silent? No, none of this could be true. It was a nightmare” (Weisel 32) shows how cruel it would have been to have been given the duty to kill, as the German soldiers had. In the end, I would rather die in the concentration camp with dignity than to die a cruel murderer.
    In conclusion I would rather be a Jewish prisoner and be able to face myself each day than live in the high society lifestyle of the German soldiers and be a cruel coward.

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  25. Emily O'Shea-Period 6/7

    If I were to experience the Holocaust I would be a Jewish prisoner. The Holocaust is a time in history that we will never forget. Adolf Hitlers name will always be remebered as horrible and so will all of his followers. Jews have nothing to regret in their history compared to the Holocaust because they were innocent.

    Even though the German soldiers had life better at that time they probably regret following Hitler now. The Jews however have no sorrow or regret in their life. "Men to the left! Women to the right!" (Wiesel 27) That is what the SS would shout. Would you really want to seperate family's like that?

    To be a German in during the Holocaust you would have to inflict fear upon the Jews. If you ever wanted to be kind you would have to do it secretly. I personally think that it would be hard to hate and torture people so badly. "Eight words spoken quietly, indifferently, without emotion. Eight short, simple words. Yet that was the moment when I parted from my mother" (Wiesel 27).

    Surviving the Holocaust was a small chance. Those who did survive most likely are going to appreciate life a lot better and live everyday as if it was their last. Being so close to death they must have realized that life is important and you only have one so have fun with it. "Don't loose faith in yourself, or in your life" (Wiesel 97).

    The opposition states that being a German soldier would be better because you are not suffering and close to death. You would be stronger than the Jews and have a sense of leadership. The Germans were also doing an inhumane act that will not be forgotten.

    In conclusion being a Jewish prisoner would be better. The Jews are innocent, value life, and will never have to regret performing such cruelty.

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  26. David King - 10th

    The Holocaust was an important part of history that should never be forgotten because Hitler killed and tortured millions of innocent people. If I were a part of the Holocaust, I would have been a Jewish prisoner. Being a Jewish prisoner would be the better position because Jews will never be able to regret any actions, Jews will now value life and the act the German soldiers performed was inhumane.
    To live as a Jew during the Holocaust, and survive, is not common. Today people believe that money is the only important thing in life, when really we are taking everything we have for granite. Just to have a little bit of food and water and being alive was an amazing feeling to the prisoners at Auschwitz. In Night, Elie Wiesel, the author, writes, “You must resist death. Don’t lose faith in yourself, or in your life.”(Wiesel 97).
    Looking back at the killing done at the concentration camps, Germans probably realize their acts were wrong. Jewish prisoners were the ones being killed and tortured; therefore they aren’t sorry or have regret. In the book Night, the SS are trained to have hatred against the Jews, so they are able to kill them any way possible (Wiesel 22).
    The opposition states that it would be better to be a German soldier, if you had to be involved with World War II. However what the German soldiers did to the Jewish people was profoundly inhumane. How could one human burn, suffocate, drown, or beat multiple humans without feeling disgusted for their actions? The novel Night written by Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor, states, “After a long moment of waiting, the executioner put the rope around his neck…they had completed their task” (Wiesel 59-60).
    In conclusion, being a Jewish prisoner would be the better position because they are innocent people, have a good perspective on life, and did not perform inhumane behavior.

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  27. Leigha O'Farrell 12th Period :]

    Prejudice had been taken farther then ever by Hitler during the holocaust. If I took part in it, I would want to be a German soldier. Yes, they were inhumane and cruel, yet there were those who secretly helped the Jewish and I think I could have been one of them.
    Jewish peoples sent to those camps were treated horribly. Many of them lost family along the way, or were killed. Many other suffered immensley and had to watch their own family members die before their eyes."The officer delt him a violent blow to the head with his trencheon" (Weisel 106).
    Many Jewish only saw the horrible side of the German officers, but there were those who helped some secretly. People were treated horribly and many didn't even make it past the gate. They were beaten and sent to work with barley any food to fill their stomachs, even many were afraid to sleep. "We won't let eachother fall asleep..." (Weisel 85).
    The opposition states that the German soldiers had no hearts and were killing machines. That may have been true about many, However, there were many who did try and help once and a while. They may also say that they could have lived being a Jewish prisoner, yet, then again they state how many people died. They could easily be one of those people, correct? Elie probably thought it would never happen to of one of his own friends. "When I awoke, in the daylight, I could see Juliek, opposite me, slumped over, dead."(Weisel 91).
    In conclusion, the holocaust was a horrible time, many lost their lives and nobody can change that. Being a German soldier was my choice, I believe I could have secretly helped those in need and not have to see my own family and friends dieing. Either side you chose there was death. Wouldn't you want to live and help those who needed it?

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  28. Ali Caruso 1st period
    The Holocaust was a major event in our history. If I had to chose between a German officer or and Jewish prisoner during the Holocaust I would chose to be a Jewish person and suffer.I would not want to be someone who puts pain on someone else, known to kill and the Jews know have something to value from this.
    To make someone else in pain for the way they are is inhumane. The book Night written by Elie Wiesel, a survior from the Holocaust, says,"After a long moment of waiting, the excutioner put the rope around his neck...they had completed their task."(Wiesel 59-60). To see the pain in someone's eyes as the Germans are hurting the Jews and starving them should make them feel terrbible for what they are doing to innocent people.
    Mrs. Frankel, a Holocaust survivor, states," In the concentration camps all you could smell was the smell of burning flesh."(March 11,2009). If anyone can sit there and not care that their killing someone they should feel disgusted for what they have done. Not only were they killing a person but they killed a mother, father, sister, brother..etc.
    The oppostion states that Germans didn't have a say in what they could and couldn't do. However Jews have a lot to gain out of the Holocaust. Mrs. Frankel, a Holocaust survivor, once said, "Never forget."(March 11,2009). Jewish people now don't take so many things for granite. They learned the real value of life and what it means to them. No one from the Holocaust will ever forget what really happened.
    In conclusion being a Jewish prisoner would be the best position during the Holocaust because they weren't know to kill, they never put pain upon someone else and they know the real value of life.

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  29. Michael Luca
    10th period

    The Holocaust was a very dark time in history when many of Jews were killed because of there religion. I would choose to be on the Jews side and be in prison because it is inhumane to kill that many people. I would choose to be on the Jews side because at least I would not look back and regret what I did.
    After the war everyone blamed the Germans for the holocaust because they did it. The Jews are certainly not going to say they did it because they were the victim. In the story the German officers talk to the Jews like they are not human because they have been trained to hate the Jews (Wiesel 28).
    Many of the Jews were transported on foot to different camps during the war because of different fronts. Many of the SS made no waste to their resources. In Night Elie Wiesel states “that night the soup tasted like corpses.”(Wiesel 62)
    However the opposition states that you are better off as a German soldier. If you were a German soldier would you not have any feeling for that unlucky soul that you were killing? What the Germans did in any way was just in a blunt and very inhumane. In the book Night by Elie Wiesel states that “he stayed there for more then a half an hour struggling between life and death dying slow and painful.” (Wiesel 62)
    In conclusion being a Jew would be better because your conscious is clear and you are innocent unlike the Germans who have killed millions of people.

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  30. Brandon Smith-10th Period

    It was once thought that the act of mass murder in an attempt to exterminate an entire religious following could not be performed by a mere human soul. This is why I would rather not be associated with a human being of this nature if I had lived during the WWII era, so naturally I would choose to be a Jewish deathcamp prisoner. Even though the German soldiers enjoyed a higher quality of life during this time period, there was no pride in killing millions of people at the command of a Fascist leader.

    Even though most might doubt that the cruel, heartless SS did not enjoy torturing the Jews, its no mystery that Hitler's private militia were under direct orders from der Fuhrer that must be carried out or else their life was forfeit. Hitler's totalitarian regime made people fear him greatly; horror stories of people disobeying him spread about the ranks of the SS. It was either their own life or the life of an imprisoned Jew, and most SS would gladly pick their own life to keep under those circumstances.

    If I was a German SS officer at a death camp like Aushwitz, I don't know how I would live with myself if I cremated innocent Jews or gassed them to death. Especially after how the Nazi's treated the dead Jewish bodies, I wouldn't be able to sleep a single night (Wiesel 26). The training to even become a killing machine they call the SS would be unbearable for me, as they are told to hate Jews and destroy them in any way that pleased their liking (Wiesel 22).

    The opposition, those who would choose to be a German soldier rather than a Jewish prisoner, states that dying as a defenseless, morale-beaten Jew has absolutely no pride in it whatsoever. However, there is plenty enough pride in dying for your religion against all odds, in this case against Hitler's fascist regime. Most of the Jew's in Aushwitz never gave up hope that they would be liberated one day; some just withered and died. They never lost faith, and resisted death in the camps for as long as they could, as it was their duty (Wiesel 97).

    In conclusion, the Holocaust/WWII era was one of the worst ages in the history of the world; the German people were blinded by false hopes that the nutcase called Hitler would bring them glory while the death of millions and millions went on across the country of Germany.

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  31. Mallory G
    9th

    The Holocaust was one of the most catastrophic parts of history. At first I would want to be a German Solider, after some serious though I came to the conclusion that I would want to be a Jewish prisoner. Even though many Jewish people died the Germans were pure killers, could not show any emotion and the solider would have to have the millions of people they killed on their conscience.

    German soldiers slaughtered millions of Jewish people. These slaughtered people were not just men but women and children as well showing that the Germans are ruthless people having many ways to kill these people. In the beginning on the book, your could tell that they will treat the women and children the same as well as the men and also with the way the chimney was described, Elie knew these men had no soul.(Wiesel 27)

    Even if these soldiers had souls no matter what your opinion or feelings were towards there Jewish prisoners, if you were a German soldier you were to do as your general commanded. If you wanted to truly help the Jews, you would have to do it in secret and that was very hard to do and majority of these helpers were killed. The doctor is a great example of this, even when he tried to help the Jews, the soldiers found out and the cost of helping was his life. (Wiesel 78)

    The opposition states that the Germans it would be better to be a German, because none of your family dies and that you’re live well off. Even so is that right to do when you kill the Jews even though they did nothing wrong, was it right to crush there hope even though that’s all they have left? The 10 million people they killed, it will be on their conscience forever always thinking back that they have killed a human being. (Wiesel 60)

    In conclusion, by writing this paper I realized that I would never want to be a German soldier. They killed 10 million people. Jewish, non-Aryans, homosexuals and gypsies, those people will always have one quality that the Germans back then will never have; Innocence.

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  32. Jillian Strimbu
    12th Period
    The Holocaust was the systematic mass slaughter of European Jews in Nazi concentration camps during World War II, led by Adolf Hitler. If I were in the Holocaust, I would rather be a Jewish prisoner than a German soldier. As a Jewish prisoner, I would be representing the Jewish race and faith, I would be standing up for what I believe in, and I would not be committing inhumane acts of violence on innocent people.
    Even though Jews were tortured and left to die of starvation, they were showing how a race can suffer and still come back stronger than ever. Despite having experienced the horrors of the concentration camps, the Jewish prisoners maintained their faith and used their terrible memories to strengthen the Jewish nation. At the end of Night, Ellie looks into a mirror in the hospital and says, “The look in his eyes, as they stared into mine, has never left me” (Wiesel 109).
    By choosing to be a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp, I would be standing up for what I believe in. Even as the Jewish prisoners were dying of starvation, being gassed in the gas chambers, and were freezing in the cold temperatures in the concentration camps, thousands of them showed their affection to god on the Rosh Hashanah by praying (Wiesel 63). This act of their dedication to the Jewish faith shows that not even the Holocaust could break the religious beliefs of the Jewish people.
    The opposition states that the German soldiers were forced to torture the Jewish prisoners or they would be killed. However, despite the teachings of Adolph Hitler, there is no acceptable moral reason for what was done to the Jews. What person with any ethical values could beat, burn, drown, or send a person to gas chambers? In the book, Wiesel is whipped twenty-five times because he catches a SS guard named Idek with a young Polish girl (Wiesel 54).
    In conclusion, in choosing to be a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp during the Holocaust, I would not only be standing up for what I believed in, but would be showing that even through inhumane acts of violence and horror, the Jewish race and faith would be able to emerge stronger than ever.

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  33. Eric Livingston
    1st period

    The Holocaust was an event that tore the world apart as we found millions of people dying under the command of Adolf Hitler. The many different people that were sent to concentration camps suffered more then many people can imagine and most of them did not make it out alive. Yet I still feel that living the life of a Jew in a concentration camp would be better then the life of a German soldier. The soldiers lived what appears to be a glamorous life, but I do not see how it would be possible to follow through with some of the actions they did.

    One reason I would prefer to be a Jew, is the support they received from the rest of the world. A large portion of the world was against what the SS were doing so they had a tarnished image so they would do everything they could just to make themselves look better (Wiesel, 88). The Jews on the other hand were empathized for and people were praying for them to be safe. No matter what, I would not want to be hated by a majority of the world. That would make completing my jobs even more difficult where as the Jews might have a sense of strength from knowing people are thinking about them. That feeling would help get me through my day to day life.

    Another thing that makes the life of a German soldier less favorable is that they had to have a specific morale that they were held to. If a German soldier showed any sympathy, then they put their own life at risk (Wiesel, 54). Even if I was being forced to live a bad life, I would like to be able to make the best of it. The Jewish prisoners were not told they had to be somber or mad. They could exhibit any kind of emotion they wanted. If a German were to show that he was nice or sympathetically, it could ruin the entire idea the Nazis tried to put into place. They were supposed to be ultimate killing machines that wouldn’t show nice emotions.

    While the opposition states that the German soldiers would at least be able to live happy lives, I disagree. I think that some of the soldiers lived awful lives because they regretted what they were doing but they had no other option (Wiesel, 75). If they decided to stop, they would be killed. The soldiers also didn’t have much better living conditions then the prisoners and few actually got to live a luxurious life. I am sure many soldiers found it difficult to complete their jobs. It is not in human nature to be able to throw children into a fire and watch as it engulfs their body. I think that given the opportunity without any consequences, many of the soldiers would have left.

    In conclusion, while the Holocaust is thought of as a terrible time for the people persecuted, I feel it would be awful to be in any relation to it. It has changed the lives of billions of people from the people directly involved, to the students learning about it today. It is an event that we should make sure is never repeated. The number lives taken during the Holocaust is not even imaginable and it is an event that should never be forgotten through history.

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  34. Kristen Schenkelberg- 10th period
    During the period when Adolf Hitler became ruler of Germany to when WWII ended, Jews were exposed to harsh persecution that led to the murder of 6 million Jews and the destruction of 5,000 Jewish communities. I would prefer to be a Jewish prisoner, rather than a German soldier in the Holocaust. It would be unbearable to be responsible for working the Jews so hard that they died of exhaustion and starvation and murder (Wiesel 81).
    The Germans actions were so horrific it was like they had no conscious for all the torture of children. When Idek was seen by Elie with the Polish girl (Wiesel 75), this shows how badly the girls at the camps were treated. Also, the time when the guards hung the young boy to instill fear in the other inmates, while he struggled between life and death for over a half hour (Wiesel 62).
    The Jewish prisoners in the Holocaust may have had less of a chance for survival and poor quality of life compared to the Germans. However, they would know when they died that they lived their life the best they could and had a clear conscience. Germans would live with extreme guilt for all the murders that they committed.
    The opposition states, that the German soldiers had no other choice, or else they would be killed too. However, they were being very selfish and cowardly because they were afraid of Hitler. Despite the excuses for their actions they still murdered many innocent people. If the people of Germany would have stood up for what was right, instead of following Hitler’s orders all the murders in the Holocaust would not have happened.
    In conclusion, it would be better to be a Jew in the Holocaust because they did nothing wrong throughout their life and would not have to face the guilt that the Germans would go through.

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  35. Jake Young- 10th period

    The Holocaust, arguably the most gruesome part of recorded history in which millions of Jews, gypsies, and impaired people were brutally murdered out of the hatred of Adolf Hitler. I think the decision between being a German soldier and a Jewish prisoner is obvious, being the prisoner because I could not do the acts the Germans committed, the Jewish people were innocent, and I could live my life without thinking what I had done in my past.
    The German officers had to be some of the most cruel people to ever live. "'Do you see that chimney over there? See it? Do you see those flames? (Yes, we did see the flames.) Over there-that's where you're going to be taken. That's your grave, over there.' (Wiesel 28) Could you imagine saying that to people with a straight face as the German Officer said to Wiesel, imagine how warped that man had to be.
    During the Holocaust Jews were forcible removed from their homes and why were they removed, just because they were Jewish! All that would keep me going during this time period is the fact that I had done nothing wrong and these were just messed up people. "I did not deny God's existence, but I doubted His absolute justice." (Wiesel 42) in this quote Wiesel is asking why God? What have I done wrong.
    The opposition states that the Nazi’s only did Hitler’s work because they feared their lives. However they didn’t run away they went through with the actions and brutally killed millions of people. People who accidentally kill a person in a car have nightmares fro the rest of their lives. How could an individual not be driven mad by the dreams the must encounter after their actions. So I say this they made the decisions they did not try to resist so it was as good as their decision. "Never shall I forget that night, the first night in camp, which has turned my life into one long night, seven times cursed and seven times sealed....Never shall I forget those moments which murdered my God and my soul and turned my dreams to dust. Never shall I forget these things, even if I am condemned to live as long as God Himself. Never." (Wiesel 32)
    In conclusion the Holocaust was a terrible time in history and I rather suffer and be a prisoner then to have to torture people, I could have peace of mind, and would not have to live with my actions.

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  36. Allison Largent
    10th Period

    The Holocaust was a period of time when many Jews lost their lives. During that time, I would have rather been a German officer who sympathized and tried to help the Jews than a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps. This would be my choice because, I would still have my family, I would be able to live and I could help Jews secretly.
    Family is one of the most important and necessary factors in life. During the Holocaust, many Jews had to watch their family members die and make decisions about using their energy to fend for themselves or help their relatives. “I had known that he was at the end, on the brink of death, and yet I had abandoned him,” said Elie Wiesel about his dad (Wiesel 101).
    “I did not move. I was afraid.” (Wiesel 106). “We were tormented with hunger. We had eaten nothing for six days, except a bit of grass or some potato peelings found near the kitchens,” (Wiesel 108). These two quotes show how Jewish prisoners could easily lose their lives, not only in the crematory, but by starvation and it is clear that no one would want to live this way.
    The opposition states that by being a German soldier I would be living the rest of my life with regret, because of all of the Jewish prisoners who were killed. However, by being a sympathetic soldier, I would have the opportunity to save the prisoners. I could provide them with extra food rations and save them from being horribly beaten. If I were a Jewish prisoner I would just be another victim of death and I would not be able to save anyone.
    In conclusion, I would much rather be a German officer who supported the Jews because, my family would still be alive, I wouldn’t be dead and I could help the Jewish prisoners.

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  37. Joey Villari

    12


    Hitler, the leader of the totalitarian Nazi party, and his associates were the minds behind the world’s largest mass genocide, the Holocaust, which took place during the Second World War. I would much rather be a Jew in a concentration camp than be a German soldier, even though the life of a soldier was much better. I could not handle killing someone, I would be able to comfort my family members and friends, and I would have been able to feel like I was standing up for what I believed, like a martyr.

    The thought of killing someone is an unthinkable, repulsive, unbearable thought. Like the German soldiers, if I were forced to kill another living human being every day, I would be scarred for life; the eerie memory would haunt my soul forever. In Night, a German executioner killed a condemned man by hanging him (Wiesel 59-60).

    Jews felt like they were standing up for what they believed in and that those times were a test from God. This would make me feel like things were going to get better and suffering would end. Elie believed that his viewings were a nightmare and that he shall wake up soon (Wiesel 30).

    The opposition states that German soldiers wouldn’t even need to worry about their family’s lives. However, they were far away from family and I would still prefer being a Jew in a concentration camp because I would be able to comfort my suffering family members. If my family members were starving or being tortured, I would be able to sit next to them and give them encouragement as to keep fighting because it will get better. In Elie Wiesel’s book, he gave his father soup and water when his dad was extremely thirsty and suffering (Wiesel 105).

    In conclusion, I would much rather be a Jew in a concentration because I could not stand living with myself knowing that I was a part of the terror, death, and pure awfulness the Nazis “manufactured” at the some forty-six concentration camps throughout the Third Reich.

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  38. Michael Butrey
    1
    Choosing between being a German soldier or a Jewish prisoner during the Holocaust is an extremely difficult question to answer because of the true horror of the Holocaust. If I would have to pick, I would chose to be a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp over being a German soldier. Although I would be a prisoner, I would not be remembered as taking part in a mass genocide.

    Being a prisoner, you still would have chance of survival even if you were put into a concentration camp. I would rather take my chances of surviving the terror rather than murdering Jews inhumanly. I would also be able to help other Jews survive and maybe even help them escape the Nazis such as father’s friend tried to accomplish (Wiesel 14).

    Having the burden of being remembered as being part of the Nazi mass genocide and having to live with treacherous memories of your own doing would be horrific. I would not be able to live with myself knowing that I was involved in the murdering of over 6 million Jews. If a were a German soldier, my conscience would not let me follow through will killing Jews such as the Lagerkapo did in the second execution (Wiesel 64) and I would probably end up dead because I did not follow orders.

    Someone might argue that you would have a better chance of surviving if you were a soldier rather than a prisoner. However, I would not be able to take part in the mass genocide that a German soldier would be forced to participate in. I would not be able to kill an innocent person for no significant reason let alone kill 6 million innocent people. I would not be able to go through with carrying out the horrible punishment of death to a boy who stole supplies during the air raid such as the executioner did to the first child (Wiesel 62).

    In conclusion, the horrific acts of the Nazi soldiers will forever haunt the world and it is our role to remember those who lost their lives during the dark hours of the Holocaust so that we will surely never forget.

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  39. Megan S.
    10th period

    The Holocaust was one of the most terrifying and immoral times in the history of humankind in which Jews were tortured and murdered by the Germens under Adolf Hitler, resulting in the death of millions of innocent people. Although all of the Jews went through barbaric and never ending days of starvation, working, and brutal treatment, if asked, I would rather be in their position then the Germens who caused thousands of guilty people unforgettable grief. Though some German soldiers secretly let some Jews get away, others simply killed person after person, without out feeling any sorrow or regret.

    Though many Nazi’s were mean and cruel, others helped Jews without anyone knowing, such as giving them extra bread or soup. (Wiesel 46) Such Germens should of helped more prisoners, since they weren’t the only ones secretly doing so. They should of realized that they could of more lives, a regret that I would never forget.

    The killing of innocent, young children is inhumane. As a German soldier, you were forced to hang, burn, or beat to death children as young as an infant. (Wiesel 62) To participate in such terrifying events would leave horrific memories in your mind, that will never go away.

    The opposition states that although you killed many, you weren’t the one getting killed. However, murdering hundreds of people, just like you, is enough to bring back the faces and haunt you. Being so incredibly cruel, will come back to you in life. Killing mothers and children together is horrifying to even think of. Then, carelessly putting the dead bodies anywhere is unimaginable, and hard to believe anyone would act in such ferocity. (Wiesel 27)

    The Holocaust was a incredibly violent event that killed over 5 million innocent people, and will never, ever, be forgotten.

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  40. Amanda Snyder 12th period

    On April 20, 1889, the world ushered in a man who was to become one of the cruelest people in history: Adolf Hitler. If I was alive during his reign and had to choose whether to be a Nazi soldier versus a Jew in the concentration camps, my answer would be simple: neither. I can honestly say that I am happy I do not have to go through the risk of death, the loss of family, and the emotional troubles that would follow.

    Elie Wiesel was able to give readers a chilling first hand account about his struggle though the camps, questioning, “... was there a single place here where you were not in danger of death?”(Wiesel 37) If you were not strong enough, or smart enough as a Jew, or cruel, and heartless as a Soldier, then your life was to be cut short through merciless execution. I would not be able to withstand the harsh lifestyle of the Jewish people, but just as well could not find in me the courage to hurt and kill innocent people based on their religion, which would lead to my death ultimately.

    For me, my family is my rock, and it was for Wiesel as well until he was separated from his mother and sisters, knowing he will never see his mom and little sister again. (Wiesel 27) My family is dysfunctional but tight knit, and would be against any separation that would weaken one’s chance at survival. Therefore, to be stripped of my closest possessions, I would be depressed and would have no hope for living any longer.

    Elie was a strong believer in God, like me, and had his faith robbed while in the camp of death, “I did not deny God’s existence, but I doubted his absolute justice.” (Wiesel 42) I respect people who have no belief in God, but for me it helps get me through tough times, and if I were to see that much pain and suffering I can honestly say my faith would be weak, and fragile. With no God, I would be hopelessly living everyday, and would just be waiting for death.

    In conclusion, the choice of life as a Jewish person struggling with God and survival, or a heartless cold Nazi soldier killing people with different views than myself, is one choice I am happy to never have to make.

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  41. Cady McElheny, 1st period


    If I were involved in the Holocaust I would much rather be a German soldier. Although the job is gruesome I would rather kill than be killed. The reason for this is I wouldn’t have to worry about whether or not I am going to live everyday, I would be in charge, and I would get treated much better than the Jewish.
    I think it would be in better to be in charge because if I got tired and didn’t want to run I wouldn’t. As the book states, “When the SS were tired, they were replaced. But no one replaced us.” (Weisel 87) I would be able to tell them what to do and what not to do. I could even help the Jewish in some situations where the commanders wouldn’t find out.
    The Jewish did not get treated well at all, sometimes not even eating. I wouldn’t have to worry about not eating or being tired. A Jewish prisoner, Juliek, in the book Night said, “ This ceremony, will it be over soon? I’m hungry…” (Weisel 62)
    Worrying about dying everyday was a factor the Jewish faced everyday. Elie’s father went through a selection and did not pass the first time and he said, “ It’s not certain yet. There’s still a chance. Today, they will do another selection…a decisive one…” (Weisel 74) If I were a German soldier I wouldn’t necessarily think that as long as I did as told.
    The opposition states that being a Jewish prisoner in the camp would be better because some people wouldn’t be able to live with the guilt of killing someone. However, if you were in that situation, fighting for your life, that might change. Worrying about dying everyday would drift out of your mind. Killing someone may still be hard but you can at least count on living another day.
    In conclusion, not worrying about being killed, being treated well, and being in charge would seem like the right way to go for me.

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  42. Jenna Miller- 6/7 Period

    The Holocaust was a tragic event that took away the lives of over six million innocent people. I feel that the more preferable position would be a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp, rather than a German officer. Even though the German officers had better living conditions at the time, they were trained to hate and torture innocent people, which, in my opinion, is an inhumane act.

    "Don't give in! You must resist death! Don't lose faith in yourself!" (Wiesel 102). Because they were so close to death, the Jewish prisoners learned to value life and truly appreciate what they were given. They understood that if they stayed strong, keeping their faith and never giving up, they would have a better chance of survival.

    The German soldiers were so strict and cruel to the millions of innocent people; no matter how they really felt, they were trained to hate not only the Jews, but Gypsies, homosexuals, etc. Even though they knew the fate of those innocent people, the Germans were forced to hate them, torture them, and make them suffer in any possible way. "Comrades, you are now in the concentration camp Auschwitz. Ahead of you lies a long road paved with suffering." (Wiesel 41).

    The opposition states that being a German soldier during the Holocaust would be more preferable because they lived in better conditions. However, the acts of these soldiers were wrong and out of hatred; simply inhumane. Killing anyone in any matter is simply wrong and the Germans killed just because their leader, Adolf Hitler demanded them to; they did it out of hatred, showing no remorse or regret. After what seemed like a long moment, the hangman put the rope around his neck...the executioner had completed his work, (Wiesel 62).

    In conclusion, being a Jewish prisoner during the Holocaust would be a better choice due to the fact that they were the ones who had a better perspective on life and came out to be the better people; they are the ones who will help us to never forget the horrible events that took place under the rule of Adolf Hitler.

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  43. Kaitlyn Bove
    12th

    During the Holocaust, more than 6 million Jews were murdered; with this statistic, I feel that this is probably one of the most important historic events to ever occur. To come to my decision, I really did have to think about whether I would prefer to be some sort of soldier who would have a great life style or one of many in a concentration camp who were treated unbelievably inhumane. Personally, I would rather be an innocent person, rather than one who kills and murders the innocent.
    When I first thought about this question, it didn’t take long before I realized if I were a soldier I would have to live with the blood of innocent people’s lives on my hands. Yes, the horror of the treatment and the loss of family would be devastating, but I’d rather suffer than have people suffer under me while I could do nothing to stop it. It is just like Wiesel wrote, “‘Do you see that chimney over there? See it? Do you see those Flames? (Yes, we did see the flames.) Over there- that’s where you’re going to be taken. That’s you’re grave, over there,’” (Wiesel 27). I cannot imagine fearing that everyday.
    To think, many people lost their faith in God during this whole thing was going on. Many could not believe how one such with great power could let this merciless and ruthless event was occurring. In Wiesel’s book, he talks about how he has more faith in Hitler than in anyone else because he has always kept his promises, especially to Jews (Wiesel 77). People these days take a lot for granite; the people in concentration camps savored their food and water, even if it was the smallest amount.
    Although the opposition states he/she would rather be a German soldier, I don’t believe this is correct under any circumstance. I cannot process how anyone could be this cruel to other humans, it’s not like they were killing animals, it was real live human beings, the same as themselves. Many other people even at the camp could not even believe such an act was going on. This killing was not fast, it was slow. For those who escaped, it was unreal to them how they looked. Wiesel himself saw himself as a corpse, and could never forget it (Wiesel 189).
    In conclusion, over 10 million were murdered including the Jews, homosexuals, and gypsies, for no true reason. It was a dark period in time, and will never be forgotten. As the Holocaust speaker came and spoke to us, she made it apparent that history repeats itself, and this is something that should never, ever happen again.

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  44. Nick Skuggen
    10th period

    Elie Wiesel wrote the book Night to emphasize that people need to remember what happened in the Holocaust so that history doesn’t repeat itself. If I had a choice between being a German soldier or a Jewish prisoner in the Holocaust I would choose to be a German soldier. Being a German soldier would be the much better choice because you wouldn’t go through all of the unbearable conditions the prisoners went through, you could continue to live and you wouldn’t necessarily have to be the kind of German that doesn’t show any mercy to the Jews.
    Being a German soldier back in the Holocaust wouldn’t necessarily mean tha1t you would have to be a terrible, heartless and feared soldier. As a German soldier you could help the Jews by giving them extra rations and clothing, and you wouldn’t hit them all the time like other soldiers. The Jews would therefore hope to be in your block because they know you would give them better treatment than the other soldiers. In Night you got lucky to land in certain camps (Wiesel 47).
    Of course not many German soldiers that ran the camps died in the Holocaust because they weren’t Jewish prisoners being forced to live in very life threatening conditions. As a prisoner in the Holocaust it was very unlikely for you to survive, however as a soldier there is no obvious reason as to why you would die. Of course I would rather live on than, most likely die as a Jewish prisoner, and even if I didn’t die I would be completely scarred and deprived of faith because of what had happened to me. “From the depths of the mirror, a corpse stared back at me”, (Wiesel 109).
    The opposition states that as a Jewish prisoner you would better appreciate life after the Holocaust. However most of the survivors of the Holocaust, like Wiesel as it portrays him in his own book, feel deprived of there faith and they’re families were killed off and feel as if there is not much reason to live on, but to make people remember what had happened. German soldiers would not have to go through all the suffering and would still have their families and people to live for. Even though I would have seen all this happened and still question faith and be scarred by the Holocaust I would still have my family and the comfort of knowing that I was lucky to not have been a prisoner. “From the depths of the mirror, a corpse stared back at me”, (Wiesel 109).
    In conclusion, being a German soldier would be a much better place in the Holocaust because they were lucky to have been treated humanely, they did not have to be a heartless soldier, they could help out the prisoners, they would live on, they would still have loved ones around them, they would not be as scarred as the prisoners were, and they would not have been deprived of their lives like the prisoners were.

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  45. Haley Mills
    6/7

    During the holocaust millions of innocent people were tortured and killed because of Adolf Hitler’s Beliefs. Although, the life of a German solider would be preferable, it seems that Jew’s had more respect for themselves. Jew’s did not kill innocent people, kept their faith, and respected everyone.
    Although, it seemed as if God did not exist in the cruel world which was a concentration camp, the Jews kept their faith. The Jews in a camp with Elie Wiesel said that they should fast for Yom Kippur because “[we] needed to show God that, even in the depths of hell we were capable of singing His praises.” (Wiesel 69) They knew that although it seemed God did not exist they needed to believe in something.
    Jew’s unlike the German Soldiers had respect for the people around them. The German soldiers felt that they were better and had more power in the world than the Jews. The Jews knew that they needed to stick together, and an inmate, when Elie Wiesel first arrived at birkenau, told him to say he was 18 (Wiesel 30), which saved him from being killed and allowed him to continue to be with his father.
    The opposition states that German soldiers killed the weak and young who would not have survived anyway. However, millions of innocent Jew’s were also killed by German soldiers. If a Jew went against something that the German Soldier stated, they were killed, or tortured. Just because Elie Wiesel witnesses something the soldiers didn’t want him to see, they told him to “lie on [his] belly” (Wiesel 57) and they proceed to whip him, to show they were better than the Jews.
    In conclusion, being a Jew, although it was very hard, would have been better than being a German Solider.

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  46. Jonathan Spielberger
    6/7

    The Holocaust is a period in history that must never repeat itself. The world will never be the same if another cruel man leads to the murder of 6 million more people. If I were involved in the Holocaust, I would prefer to be a Jewish prisoner over a German soldier. I feel that it would be better to be a Jew because if I survived my perspective on life would be so altered that I would be hard pressed to find something that would sadden my spirits. However if I died my death, along with the other millions of deaths would never be forgotten, I also would not have any guilt for being a prisoner.
    I would not feel any guilt from being a Jewish prisoner because I simply would be doing nothing wrong. The German soldiers working in the camps would be the ones committing inhumane acts. Like mentioned in the story night the SS are trained to have hatred against the Jews, so they are able to kill them any way possible (Weisel 22).
    I feel that dying in the Holocaust isn’t a completely terrible thing. While 6 million innocent Jews did lose their lives, not a single one of those deaths have been forgotten to this day. “Since my father’s death, nothing mattered to me anymore”. (Weisel 113)
    The opposition states that while the Germans did horrible things they still had happy luxurious lives. However being in the Holocaust, anything that would be considered normal would be considered great blessings. Perhaps an extra sip of soup, or some water, mundane things that would be treated as jewels. It would be very challenging to find something that will sadden the spirits of those in concentration camps. “No thought of revenge, or of parents. Only of bread.” (Weisel 115).
    In conclusion being a Jew in a concentration camp would be difficult but the over all impact on my life would be changed for the better

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  47. Kristen Howell
    6/7


    The Holocaust was a period in history when German soldiers, under the command of Adolf Hitler, exterminated innocent Jewish people from their homes and executed millions of them. Given the choice of being either a German soldier or a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp, I would decide on being a German soldier. This is because the Germans had a better lifestyle, they weren’t forced to work, and they weren’t in danger of dying.


    The first reason I would choose to live a life as a German soldier is because they weren’t forced to work. Jewish people were taken to concentration camps and were forced to work for a small amount of food, and some weren’t able to handle the hard work. On pages 38-39, Wiesel quotes a soldier who said, “Here, you must work. If you don’t you will go straight to the chimney.” (Wiesel 38-39).


    Another reason that I’d favor being a German is that they weren’t in danger of dying. “In our minds, he was already dead,” says Elie Wiesel on page 59 about a man who tries to take some soup (Wiesel 59). Everyone believes that the death of the millions of Jews is to be blamed on all Germans, though not all of them were responsible for killing many of these people.


    The opposition states that it would be more of an honor to be a Jewish prisoner. However, the Germans lived a much better lifestyle. In the book, Elie Wiesel thanks God that he is still alive (Wiesel 35). Clearly, the life that the Germans had was preferable to the lives of the Jewish prisoners.


    In conclusion, many people say that they would rather have been a suffering Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp, but they probably wouldn’t feel that way if they had actually been a part of the Holocaust.

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  48. Allie Alu
    12th Period


    The Holocaust was a horrible part of History, where many innocent Jewish prisoners were killed for absolutely no reason. If I had to choose to either be a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp or a German Soldier I would choose to be the prisoner because of various obvious reasons. I personally think being the Jewish prisoner is a much better position then being a German soldier, how could you live with yourself after killing innocent people?

    My first point on why being a Jewish prisoner would be better then a German soldier is about how the soldiers are able to live with themselves. They kill innocent people who did absolutely nothing because of orders they were given, and I don't understand how they could live with their selves after that. I’d rather get more respect from just being the prisoner who did nothing then being the soldiers who kill them and having all the guilt for their whole lives. "The corpses were collected in hundreds everyday."- (Weisel 66 & 67)

    My second point on why being a Jewish prisoner would be better is that I just wouldn't want to kill people at all. I strongly believe that killing anyone especially if they did nothing at all is completely inhumane and wrong. "Suddenly I remembered him. How would he pass the selection? He had aged so much..."-(Weisel 67) Things such as what Weisel said in that sentence were just some of the examples on how they killed the innocent people, and it was horrible.

    The opposition states that German soldiers lived a way better life then the Jewish prisoners. However would you honestly want to kill the innocent people who did nothing to anyone just to keep your life and your position in the army. Doing things that the German soldiers did, and for the reasons that most of them did them is just absolutely horrible. "We were forbidden to sit down or even move."- (Weisel 92) these kinds of things that went on should not have been allowed.

    In conclusion being a Jewish prisoner might not have been the best life but you would have gained way more respect then the German soldiers. The Holocaust was a horrible time to even be included in at all, but it happened and we can't change the past. Hopefully something like this will never happen again, and we've learned our lesson.

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  49. Sarah Alflen
    12th

    Torture-to cause or inflict pain; Murder-To kill brutally or inhumanly; for Adolf Hitler these words were not in his repertoire. For me being a Jewish person in a concentration camp would be better than a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle. Even though life was harder for the Jewish race, killing other human beings for no reason is atrocious.
    Why would the German people want to work for Hitler? He made them throw babies into a pit of fire as well as gas people just to make room for more people in the concentration camp (Wiesel 30). How could the workers live with themselves every day knowing that they have killed thousands of Jews, homosexuals, gypsies and non-Aryans?
    “Remember this forever. Engrave it into your minds. You are Auschwitz…,” said a SS officer at the concentration camp, and with this he was able to control the Jewish people as well as state that if they decide not to work then they would be sent to the crematory (Wiesel 36). Fear was the only thing that kept the Jews working and in Night by Elie Wiesel, if Idek, who had been seen with the Polish girl by Elie, didn’t punish Elie to keep him in line then Elie probably would have told other people (Wiesel 54).
    If you were a Jew entering a concentration camp it would be very likely that your body would never leave. The people who went through those camps never took anything for more than it was worth even if it was the amount of food they received or the hours of work they did because if they complained they would be killed. Today people believe that money defines everything and that money is needed to be happy but it actually doesn’t, like right now the world had taken too much money out and now the world is in a crisis.
    In conclusion it would be better to be a Jewish prisoner because in the end “The Jewish people won since they were still alive and Hitler is dead,” said Eita Frankel, a Jewish concentration camp survivor.

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  50. Ryan Schneider
    6/7

    The Holocaust, a time when Jews, homosexuals, and gypsies were being killed and very badly tortured in the concentration camps like they didn’t matter. If I had a choice I would be a Jewish prisoner living in a concentration camp rather then a German soldier. The Jewish people didn’t do anything harmful, they did not regret anything they did, and they would look at life in a different prospective.
    While in concentration the camps, the Jewish people did not do anything to hurt or torture anyone. German soldiers on the other hand were killing people by the millions and torturing even more people. The German soldiers were torturing the Jews so badly that it made them give up like when Meir Katz said “Shlomo, I am getting weak. My strength is gone. I won’t make it…” (Wiesel 102).
    Jews did not regret any actions they had taken but that is the completely the opposite for the German soldiers. After the war was over, the German soldiers probably all thought to them selves what was I thinking. In the book Night, without passion or haste, they shot their prisoners, who were forced to approach the trench one by one and offer their necks (Wiesel 6) is just one example of many where German soldiers would have regret.
    After the war was over, the Jewish people that survived viewed life as a privilege instead of a right. The Jews were so close to death that they thought god gave up on them because it was too late, but the Germans didn’t experience this which is why Jews would cherish life more than the Germans. Like when Akiba Drumer said: “It’s over. God is no longer with us.” (Wiesel 76).
    In conclusion, being a Jewish prisoner living in concentration camps would be a better life then being a German soldier because the Jews didn’t do anything bad, they didn’t regret anything that they did, and they would be more passionate toward life.

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  51. Sarah Mohr 6-7
    The Holocaust claimed the lives of countless innocent people who were forced to spend their last days as hungry slaves. If I were to be a part of the Holocaust, I would be a Jew. I reason this way because I could never stand the guilt of killing a person as the Nazis did, the crimes against the Jews were dreadfully uncivilized, and there are always consequences to actions.
    I don’t think I would make a very good Nazi officer, as I would never be able to watch a person die and know it was my fault. “The officer wielded his club and dealt him a violent blow to the head,” said Elie Wiesel of the death of his father (Wiesel 111). I would rather die tired, cold and hungry in a concentration camp than live on with the responsibility of others’ brutal deaths lying heavily on my shoulders.
    The crimes committed by the Nazis were so vulgar and archaic. “You old loafer! Is this what you call working?” said a German officer (Wiesel 54). Never could I justify the outrageous mistreatment of the Jewish people because I already know that they are just as much a person as I am.
    The opposition says that being a Nazi is the only way to insure their safety. However, no action goes without consequence. “And in the course of those evenings I became convinced that Moishe the Beadle would help me enter eternity, into that time when question and answer would become ONE,” said Elie Wiesel on page 5. I do believe that in the end, there will be a consequence for every action good and bad and an answer for every question.
    In conclusion, I would prefer dying as a Jew to dying as a Nazi because I could never handle the guilt of killing, what the Nazis did to Jews was too uncultured to be human, and because every evil action will be retaliated with an equally horrific consequence.

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  52. Caitlin Shelar period 6/7

    The book Night written by Elie Wiesel, reminds us of the discrimination of Jews in the Holocaust and how it should never be forgotten. If I was in the Holocaust I would have been a Jewish Prisoner because I would have a better value on life and accept anyone not based on what culture or religion they are. I would not like to be a German Soldier because of the way they tortured and killed the Jews. Germans until this day should still regret their actions because of all the lives they costed.
    Adolf Hitler should be declared the most inhumane man alive. For training his SS officers to get rid of Jews by burning, starvation, suffocation, drowning, or beating. The Germans should have realized their actions were wrong and should be sorry for everything that they caused. All of the remaining Jews should be happy they were still alive and to always still believe in their faith as the author Elie Wiesel wrote, "I did not deny God's existence, but I doubted His absolute justice."(Wiesel 42).
    To live from the Holocaust was amazing for most Jews. Most people today still don't realize what these people went through because they take things for granite and help themselves, more than others. These people went through the worst tortures and some were lucky enough to be alive from Auschwitz followed by other concentration camps. "We were all going to die here. All limits had been passed. No one had any strength left. And again the night would be long."(Wiesel 98).
    The opposition states that the SS German officers were forced to kill the Jews to save their own lives instead of going into the war. However, what the Germans did to the Jews was still wrong and should have never happened. The will power of these men to kill all these helpless and innocent people was just wrong. In Night, Elie Wiesel, the author, states, "'Do you see that chimney over there? See it? Do you see those flames? Yes, we did see the flames. Over there-that's where you're going to be taken. That's your grave, over there.”(Wiesel 28).
    In Conclusion, The Discrimination of the Jews in the Holocaust was one of darkest inhumane hours of life. It is a part of history that should never be repeated and we have learned from the stories of survivors to never repeat this part of history again.

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  53. Austin Makadia 1 period
    Would you want rather be a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps? I rather be a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle than be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps. Three reasons why I would rather be a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps, one is power, wealth, and some had humanity.
    The German soldiers have power over the people in the camps. A quote from the book that states why is, “On the fourth day, as we stood in front of our tent, the Kapos appeared. Each one began to choose the men he liked: “You… you… you…”” said Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor (Wiesel 49).The statement above shows that the power is with the German soldiers
    A German soldier would gain money and wealth. Some quotes from the book are, “On the other hand, the dentist seemed more conscientious; he asked me to open my mouth wide. In fact, he was not looking for decay but for gold teeth. I did have a gold crown,” said Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor (Wiesel 48)and, “It appeared that he had been dealing in the prisoners’ gold teeth for his own benefit,” said Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor (Wiesel 52) The lines above show that the soldiers did get wealthy from the Jewish people.
    The opposition states that all the German soldiers were cruel to the Jewish people. However some of the German soldiers were humane. Some quotes from the book are, “He was a young Pole, who was smiling at us,” said Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor (Wiesel 41). “By driving out despair, you will more away from death,” said the Polish Kapo, a Holocaust Kapo (Wiesel 41). “Those were the first human words,” said Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor (Wiesel 41).These lines show that some of the German soldiers are humane.
    In Conclusion, being a German soldier is better than being a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camp.

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  54. Ian Johnson 6/7 period

    During the Holocaust, 6 million Jews and 5 million others that the Nazis deemed “unfit” for the Third Reich were brutally murdered in the worst genocide in human history. If I had to make the choice, I would choose to be a Jewish prisoner over a German guard in the concentration camps. I would choose this because however badly the prisoners suffered, they kept their humanity.

    First, when humans are put to the test or forced into terrible suffering, it often brings out the best parts in the oppressed. The Jews kept their faith in God, as is shown in their celebration of Rosh Hashanah (Wiesel, 66). Also, it created a bond between the inmates, as evidenced in the Frenchwoman’s trust of Elie after he is beaten bloody by Idek (Wiesel, 52).

    Secondly, despite the fact that the Germans could have protested the treatment of the Jews and tried to help them, thereby keeping both the physical comfort and moral integrity, they did not. They stood by and watched as Dr. Mengele decided who would live and who would die (Wiesel, 71).In the words of Edmund Burke, “All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is for good men to do nothing.”

    The opposition says that a life of comfort will always be a better option than physical suffering. However, that comfort isn’t as easy to enjoy when you know it is being paid for with the blood of innocent people. No person can sleep in their nice bed at night after being employed all day as a murderer and a torturer (Wiesel, 32). The Jews may have had their humanity taken away from them, but the Nazi guards gave their humanity away willingly in each person they sent to the gas chambers or worked to death.

    In conclusion, being a Jewish prisoner and keeping your morality is worth the physical suffering, rather that giving away any sense of humanity and morality by murdering millions of innocent human beings.

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  55. Zac Strimbu
    Period 6/7

    When I was asked whether I would want to be a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps, it took me a long time to decide on my answer. Personally, I would want to be a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle even with all the horrible things that they did. My reasons for this decision are that I would not be dying and starving like a Jewish prisoner would be, I would live a well off lifestyle so I would have a decent life, and I wouldn’t have to worry about my friends and relatives dying.
    The first reason why I chose to be a German soldier is that I would have a well off lifestyle. Everybody wants to live a nice and comfortable life and I share that view, so the lifestyle of a German soldier is more appealing to me than a lifestyle of a Jewish prisoner. This is what Wiesel said about how degraded Jewish prisoners were, “We had forgotten everything-death, fatigue, our natural needs. Stronger than cold or hunger, stronger than the shots and the desire to die, condemned and wandering, mere numbers, we were the only men on earth” (Wiesel 83).
    Another reason I would choose to be a German soldier is because I wouldn’t have to worry about my family and friends dying. Wiesel was greatly affected by his father’s death; this is what he said he felt, “After my father’s death, nothing could touch me anymore” (Wiesel 107). The death of a relative is a terrible thing to go through and the Jewish prisoners had to go through it everyday, so if I was a German soldier I wouldn’t have to experience that.
    The opposition states that to be a German soldier under Hitler is practically like doing the devils work. However, I believe that my life is the most important thing to me and if it means I must do the devils work to not be killed I will do that. Every day thousands of Jews were killed in concentration camps and each Jew thought they were going to die, like Elie who said, “We are all going to die here. All limits had been passed. No one had any strength left. And again the night would be long” (Wiesel 98).
    In conclusion, being a German soldier with a high society life is more appealing to me than being a Jewish prisoner because while I may be forced to do terrible things, my relatives and I would have survived this horrible time in history.

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  56. Kristin Kenny
    6/7 period



    Devastation and terror describe life during the Holocaust and therefore should never be forgotten. Although Germans had it easier, I would choose to be a Jewish prisoner. A Jewish prisoner is the better choice because the Jews were innocent so they didn't have to live with a guilty conscience, the Nazis were too brutal and have to live with what they've done, and the Jews had the will to fight and survive.

    The innocence and righteousness of the Jews is what makes the Holocaust so sad. The Jews were brutally slaughtered and yet some still found strength and kept their faith alive. "Bite your lips little brother...Don't cry. Keep your anger, your hate, for another day, for later. The day will come but not now...Wait. Clench your teeth and wait..." said one French girl (Wiesel 53) which shows the sadness and innocence of Elie and how no one deserved this.

    The Nazis were sick, disgusting people and I don't see how someone could burn and torture innocent people and not feel the slightest bit of remorse. Hitler's workers showed no mercy and killed Jews slowly and painfully but what makes being a Nazi the worst is that they hated Jews because they were told to not for a legite reason. "Work or crematorium-the choice is yours." said an SS officer (Wiesel 39) which shows that either way you were going to die and the Nazis didn't care one bit.

    The opposition states that being a German soldier during the Holocaust is better. However, it is not because the Jews had the will to fight and survive and much more courage than the German soldiers. Not many people survived but those who did knew that to live was everything and they were determined to see the happy ending which makes their bravery truly admirable. "I could have screamed in anger. To have lived and endured so much; was I going to let my father die now?" said Elie Wiesel (Wiesel 105) which shows Elie's thirst and drive for life.

    In conclusion it is better to be a Jewish prisoner during the Holocaust because the Jews were innocent and didn't deserve it, the Germans were unthinkably cruel, and the Jews had strong faith and the desire to survive.

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  57. Johnathan O'Donnell
    6/7 Period
    It is important to always remember what the fascist totalitarian rule of Adolph Hitler and the Nazi regime did to the Jews and other non-Aryans and humans deemed not fit to live. I would rather be a German soldier than a Jewish prisoner. There are three major reasons why I would rather be a German.
    The first reason is the beliefs of Judaism. Specifically, Jewish people believe Rosh Hashanah is the Day of Judgment, which is what Elie mentions on page 66, “…Rosh Hashanah, the last of that cursed year.” I do not share this or other beliefs so I would not be Jewish in the first place.
    Second, the Jewish people had to live with fear everyday. Elie’s father talked about being taken away from their home on page 13. If you were a German you would not have to live with the fear of being taken from your home, sent to a concentration camp, and gassed or burned alive. Although this may sound selfish, I could do much more as a member of the German resistance.
    The opposition states that the Nazis treated the Jewish people horribly; this is evident on page 32 when Elie says he sees babies and children thrown into the fire. However, Germans are not necessarily Nazis, and as a German soldier I could participate in the German resistance. As part of the German resistance, I would assist in trying to end Hitler’s rule by ending his life or removing him from power. This would allow the Jewish suffering and death to end.
    In conclusion, as a German soldier in the German resistance, I would be able to contribute to ending Hitler’s rule, and therefore do more than any Jewish prisoner could do.

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  58. Amanda Velez
    6/7th period

    The Holocaust was a very devistating event but if i had to choose I'd be a German solider for many reasons. One, they had to have the will to kill someone,two, they had to give orders to the jews, and three, they didnt have to suffer any looses or feel pain like the jews did.

    While the Holocaust was occuring the Germans had to stay in the camp but they did nothing but shout out orders to the jews."Men to the left! Women to the right!(Wiesel 27) As you can see the men went to work while the women marched to their possible death or their days to be a worker since the Germans did nothin but bark and sit.

    The Germans had to kill many people or atleast have the guts so tell them they were going to die and watche it."I was thinking of my father. He must have suffered more than I did"(Wiesel 46) The Jews lost so many family members that ment most while the Germans sat around killing them feeling no remorse or sympathy at all.

    The opposition states that being a Jew would be better since you would triumph and have memories to share and teach about. However, i say that being a solider was better since you knew your family was save and you couldnt be killed unless you went against Hitler."After my father's death, nothing could touch me any more."(Wiesel 107) Jews lost their families and I'm sorry for them but the thought of loosing my family is unbarible and sad so i want to be a German to make sure my family was safe and secure.

    In conclusion, I personally think that being a German was better than being a Jew since you could live, feel free, and keep your family.

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  59. Dana Strimbu

    The Holocaust is a very important part of history because it shows that once a person takes power, they can do whatever they want with it and because of that abuse of power we should never let that tragedy happen again. If I had to make the decision whether to be a Jewish prisoner or a German soldier during the Holocaust, I would be a Jewish prisoner. I would rather be a Jewish prisoner because I could never kill people the way they did during the Holocaust, I would keep my pride and faith in the Jewish religion, and I would rather die being true to myself than live and turn into a ruthless killer.

    The first reason why I would rather be a Jewish prisoner than a German soldier is because I could never tell people to go into a room, step into the center of a room and be gassed to death. “Faster! Faster! Move you lazy good-for-nothings!” said Elie, a Holocaust survivor (Wiesel 19). The German soldiers killed people by gunshot, in gas chambers and by starvation and I could never kill people in these brutal ways.

    The second reason why I would rather be a Jewish prisoner than a German soldier is that I would rather stay true to myself and my faith than lose myself in believing the teachings Adolph Hilter. “Man comes closer to God with the questions he asks him, he liked to say.” said, Elie, a Holocaust survivor (Wiesel 19). This shows how close to God the people were and that even though they were all on their way to death, they kept their faith in God.

    The opposition states that the Jews could not be accepted into regular German life, that they were never to be accepted in the German government, and could never be German soldiers. However, if I was a Jew I would have rather died with my pride as a Jewish person than to have the opportunity to turn into a ruthless killing machine. Also, I think that being true to yourself is always better than turning into someone you’re not and I would have rather died with my faith than killed people horribly.”There are eighty of you in the car, if anyone goes missing you will all be shot like dogs.” a German officer said on page 24 where Elie clearly recognizes that the Jews will never be accepted into German society.

    In conclusion, the Holocaust is a very important part of history because once we let one person get absolute power, they can do whatever they want with it and because of that they can convince people to commit terrible things to their fellow man, things that I could never do.

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  60. Jimmy Emerson
    Period: 6/7

    Making the decision between being a German soldier and a Jewish prisoner was difficult however; the humane decision would be the Jewish prisoner. I chose to rather be the prisoner, because of three main reasons. One, watching hundreds, even thousands of people die by your hands is insanity, two, if you were caught attempting to help Jews in any way you would die, three, the fact of knowing every Jew’s fate while they walked into their camps would be to much to burden and I, for one, would go insane.

    Jews were killed ever day by the hands of German soldiers, during the Holocaust. “I heard the pounding of my heart. The hundreds of people who died daily in Auschwitz and Birkenau, in the crematoria, no longer troubled me”. Wiesel said on page 62. This explains how everyone, including German soldiers had to watch hundreds of people die each day.

    No help was given to any person, of any age, of any illness. If a German officer was caught even helping an elderly person up, their penalty was death. “And so he remained for more than half an hour lingering between life and death, writhing before our eyes. And we were forced to look at him at close range.” Wiesel said on page 65. This presents that no one could help this poor child clinging for life on the gallows; Wiesel also states not even God could help them.

    The opposition states being a German soldier would mean not to have been tortured, and living peacefully after the war had ended. However, I believe that a lot of German soldiers could have gone insane during the Holocaust period, and that life couldn’t have been anywhere near peaceful after the war. When Wiesel caught Idek with the Polish women, Idek knew if Elie should speak up he would die from his superiors, so he beat the memory out of him to ensure he kept his life (Wiesel page 54). This illustrates that even if a German soldier should help or interact with the Jewish prisoners, they would be dealt with through the penalty of death.

    In conclusion the choice of being the Jewish prisoner, would be more humane, due to the fact of taking hundreds of lives in your own hands, the fear of helping or interacting with a prisoner, and carrying the burden of knowing the fate of every Jew that walked into the concentration camps, would just be to hard to endure as a German soldier.

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  61. Lexi Emerson 6/7 PeriodMarch 17, 2009 at 10:56 PM

    Six million guiltless people died in the holocaust because Adolf Hitler felt it was necessary, under the watch of German soldiers who felt no empathy toward them, the soldiers watched them ware away and die off while living their lives contently. I would rather be one of the six million who perished during the holocaust then be one of the Germans who stood by and watched this catastrophic event occur. The many people who were in concentration camps strived to live; it took a lot for them to loose hope, they died for what they believed in and their religious views, being a German soldier would be heartless; they let millions die and didn’t show any emotion.

    Throughout everything the Jewish, homosexuals, gypsies and others lived off optimism, they looked for the better side of things and tried to never see the worst, they were so happy to be alive for yet another day each time they woke up in the morning. After being split up from family and friends every raced to find their relatives to make sure they were still alive; Every encounter filled us with joy—yes, joy: Thank God! You are still alive! (Wiesel 35). Although many did give up hope, people supported them and made attempts to convince them to live longer, and to persevere.

    German Soldiers watched thousands die everyday even assisting with the assignment and worsening the life for all in the concentration camps. Although they were forced to kill people, no one rebelled, almost everyone didn’t think twice about killing millions of people and the few who did didn’t do much or help much. Nearly all Germans chose their safety over the millions of others who they watched die, putting them through an unforgettable experience. An SS officer had come in and, with him, the smell of the Angel of Death (Wiesel 38) this displays the fear and uncompassionate presence the German soldiers carried with them.

    The opposition states being a German soldier would be the way to survive, the way to live with freedoms and rights. However killing innocent people is unjust, surviving for all the wrong reasons is worse than dying to preserve your beliefs. Although many died for their titles or beliefs, some survived to teach society, hoping an event such as the holocaust will never happen again. Elie describes how he will never forget his experiences in the holocaust he wants to teach people about one of history’s most tragic events; Never shall I forget that night, the first night in the camp, that turned my life into one long night seven times sealed (Wiesel 34).

    In conclusion living as a Jewish prisoner would be a moral decision because to die for what you believe in would be more honorable than killing innocent believers.

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  62. Connor McDevitt
    English 9 Honors


    During the Holocaust, an extremely large amount of Jews were killed along with other races and groups of people, such as gypsies and the mentally retarded. In my own opinion, I would prefer to be one of the German soldiers over a Jewish prisoner. This is because they have a very great power in the camps, could control what the Jewish prisoners did, and were able to eat and stay healthy.

    One of the reasons I would want to be a German soldier rather than a Jewish prisoner is because of the fact that I have some form of power in the camps. In Night, there was an instance where one of the prison guards, Idek, was beating the prisoners with an iron bar (Wiesel 54). This paraphrase shows off the large amount of power that the soldiers held over the Jews’ heads as they were contained in the camp; I would prefer to have this power rather than be nothing but a number in the deadly camps.

    Another reason I would rather be a soldier over a prisoner is that the soldiers have the ability to contain the prisoners rather than be contained; they can control the prisoners’ schedules. In Night, it is explained how the guard would only allow the prisoners out for food one night which strikes fear into the prisoners as they knew that an inspection will be taking place (Wiesel 70). I would rather have the ability to contain the prisoners rather than have no say at all and be contained with the fear of knowing I may not make it past the expected inspection.

    The opposition states that being without food for a long time will allow the prisoner to become closer to God and learn a bit more about themselves in this process of “fasting”. However, I feel that it would be tragic to go without food for so long, and being a German soldier would have provided me with food and a nice style of living. In Night the physical appearance of the guards is portrayed as strong and never hungry (Wiesel 47) while he describes himself and others as scrawny and hungry (Wiesel 97).

    In conclusion, I would much rather be a German soldier over a Jewish prisoner for the simple reasons of power, control, and a nice food-filled life.

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  63. Jake Ravens
    Period 6-7

    “Would you rather be a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps?” If I had to choose between those two options I would much rather be a German soldier. A German soldier during the Holocaust does not have to worry about being killed, gets to do something that they think is right and would live better lives than those in the Holocaust.

    The prisoners in the camps worried constantly about dying, but especially during the selection (Wiesel 72). However, as a German soldier I would not have to worry about dying in the horrible ways many of the prisoners did. In a situation as dangerous as the one in German occupied territory, ensuring your own survival is the most important thing.

    Although I do not personally think that what happened in the Holocaust was right, if I was a German soldier then I would think differently. These soldiers had to kill innocent babies who were guilty of no crimes other than being born into a despised group of people (Wiesel 32). German soldiers would have to think that what they were doing was right in order to even consider doing what they did, and if I was a German soldier then I would think the same.

    The opposition states that prisoners who survive the Holocaust would get to live lives free of the horrible guilt that comes with killing innocent people. However, a German soldier has the potential to live a much better life than a surviving prisoner. As I have stated before, most of these soldiers would think that what they were doing is right, and thus would not feel guilty for doing something that they thought would make their country a better place. In fact, one could argue that the survivors would live the rest of their lives as former shells of their old selves who are haunted forever by their experiences (Wiesel 115).

    In conclusion, if given the choice between being a prisoner in a concentration camp and being a German soldier then I would choose to be a German soldier because I would live a much better life than if I was a prisoner.

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  64. Deanna Crum
    3/15/2009
    English / 12
    Night Final Exam

    The Holocaust was a horrid time of discrimination, suffering and mass murder, brought about by Hitler and his followers, and is an event that must be learned from and never repeated. Being a doctor in a concentration camp would be better than being a prisoner or head of tent in charge of the Jews, because it would leave you with fewer regrets than being a harsh head of tent, and would bring less suffering than being a Jewish prisoner. While I would certainly not want to suffer as badly as the Jews did during the Holocaust, I would not want to be an SS officer forced to live with the suffering and killing of so many millions of people on my conscience, so I would like to be a doctor in the concentration camps, able to help the Jews without risking my life.
    I would not want to be a true SS officer. These officers were in charge of keeping the Jews oppressed and punishing them, and I can’t imagine having to live with myself if I had been the cause of anyone, yet alone millions of Jews’ deaths and sufferings. If an officer showed mercy, he would be killed, as shown when Elie’s one merciful Kapo was taken away and replaced by a crueler Kapo (Wiesel 41).
    I would not want to be forced to endure the horrible suffering the Jews were subjected to during the Holocaust. They were never given enough food or clothing, lived in fear of being killed or dying of starvation or cold every day, and were forced to toil away at work camps, if they weren’t killed upon entrance to the concentration camps. This horrific quality of life did significant physical and emotional damage to the survivors, expressed when Elie states that the Holocaust robbed him of his faith forever, and robbed them of their former lives with family and friends (Wiesel 32).
    The opposition states that SS officers got to live a high-society life of luxury over the Jews, and that the Jews at least had each other for support. However, a doctor wouldn’t have to kill or add to the suffering of the Jews, and got to spend their time among his patients if they chose to do so. A doctor’s job is to help people, and relieve their suffering. A doctor in a concentration camp could help the Jews that were sent to the hospital, and could give them hope and encouragement, like when the doctor brings Elie water and smiles at him, and encourages him, and doctors didn’t have to be cruel, but didn’t have to risk their life to do so, as an SS officer in charge of a group of prisoners would (Wiesel 76).
    In conclusion, being a doctor in a concentration camp would be the ideal situation to be in if you were doomed to a life in the concentration camps during the Holocaust.

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  65. M. D'Angelo 1st period

    The Holocaust was a mass-murder that caused the death of millions of people, and changed the lives of millions more; it is important that we learn about this tragic era of history and “never forget” so that we can prevent such happenings in the future. Although it contradicts the lesson we are trying to learn, if I had to choose between the life of a Jewish prisoner or a German soldier, I would be German. I would prefer this lifestyle, not only because of the comfort it would mean for me, but the protection it would mean for my family.
    The soldiers for the German army lived a no where near perfect life, but it was certainly better than those of whom they were forced to treat so cruelly. They lived somewhat luxuriously compared to the others and most of them escaped the Polish and foreign armies. They were lucky to be able to begin their lives again and make a fresh start.
    The Jewish prisoners were so closely watched and were so exhausted from all that they had to do to take care of themselves, that they had no chance of helping others undergoing the same thing; “In this place it’s every man for himself, and you cannot think of others,” said the Blockalteste in charge of Elie’s block (Wiesel, 110). A German soldier could choose to be merciful and could be the person that all of the Jews looked to for hope and help. If I was in that position, I would do whatever it takes to help as many prisoners as I could, and be like the person in charge of Elie’s first block in Auschwitz, who said “Don’t lose faith” (Wiesel, 41).
    The opposition states that the Germans were selfish and they didn’t care for anyone else in the world and that by taking the position of a Jew, they are being noble and selfless; this is simply stating what we hope the world would do if they had to choose. However, the German soldiers did care for others; they cared for their families. For me, the worst thing that could happen in a time like that would be to know that whatever pain I am suffering from, my family is probably suffering more; “The only thing that keeps me alive, is to know that Reizel and the little ones are still alive,” said Stein, a relative of Elie’s from Antwerp (Wiesel, 45). Even out of those who say that they would do the right thing, most would simply change their mind in the heat of the moment because very few would choose to have such a haunting end for themselves and their family.
    In conclusion, I would rather be a soldier for the German Army, know that my family is safe and have the chance to help others than to be thoroughly doomed in a concentration camp and forgotten.

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  66. Annie Lyons 1

    The Holocaust was a terrible experience that cost over six million Jews their lives. If I were given the choice to be a German soldier or a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp, I would choose to be a Jew. I would choose to be a Jew because they had strong faith throughout the Holocaust, I would not be able to live with myself being a German soldier, and the Germans had lost their humanity.
    During the Holocaust the Germans lost nearly every shred of humanity left in them, and treated the Jews terribly without remorse. A German officer approached Elie's father and yelled at him to be quiet but he couldn’t hear the man because of the amount of pain he was in, and continued to call to Elie. The German officer then struck him violently with a club in the head to quiet him(Weisel, p.111). This paraphrased quote clearly shows that the German soldiers could not even take pity on someone as helpless as a dying old man, only asking for water. Their hearts had been hardened by the war to the point where I believe they felt absolutely no emotion or regret towards anyone.
    Another reason I would choose to be a Jew rather than a German is because I know that I would never be able to live with the things that the German soldiers did to the innocent Jews during the Holocaust. All of the Jewish prisoners were forced to walk past the bodies of two men and a boy who had just been hung. The two men had died but the young boy, too light, was still breathing while hanging from the rope, and all the prisoners had to watch him writhe in the noose and look into his eyes that were still blinking and look at his tongue that was still red with life.(Weisel: p.65). This paraphrased quote assures me that I would not be able to stand life as a German soldier because I would never be able to but a young, innocent boy to death- and never would I be able to watch him struggle and die the way that they did. I would not be able to live with myself if I did the terrible things that the Germans did to the Jews like sending them to the gas chambers and crematoriums, or refuse them food and water and make them run and do labor when they are literally on the brink of death.
    The opposition states that being a German soldier would be better than being a Jewish prisoner because they would have food and good health and be in control, and that they would rather be a German and survive than die as a Jew. However, the Jewish people had their strong faith in God to help them make it through all the terrible things that happened to them during the Holocaust. Many of the Jews in the concentration camps gathered together on the eve of Rash Hashanah to pray, and give thanks and praise to God as they all prayed “blessed be God’s name.”(Weisel: p.67). This paraphrased quote goes to show that even though the Jews were faced with unimaginable struggles, it was still no match for their undying faith in God. It would have been very easy for the Jewish people to lose trust in God because of the anguish that was going on around them, but that just made it more clear to them that God was what they could turn to to ask for relief from this treacherous situation.
    In conclusion, I would rather keep my religious beliefs and be a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp than be a German soldier who killed millions of innocent people.

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  67. Logan Dilik 12

    Thinking about the holocaust is not an easy thing to do for me, as I imagine it would be hard for anyone one to think about, because of the Germans lack of sympathy towards the life of millions of Jews. Even taking into consideration the severity of the Germans heartless acts towards the Jews, I still think being a German soldier would be my choice in deciding who I would rather be. Being a German soldier, I know I would live through everything, I would not have to go through seeing all of my friends and family undergo long, painful deaths, and I would know that what I did was not a choice, but a direct order of what I had to do.

    Being a German soldier would, undoubtedly, be the worst job a person could ever have to do, not matter how much money was involved, but during the Holocaust, Jews died and the German soldiers survived, and that is why I would chose to be a German soldier. Jews had virtually no chance of living; practically every one thought as soon as they arrived in Auschwitz and saw the chimney’s that obtained the rancid smell of burnt human flesh that their fate was death (Wiesel 28). Therefore, being a German soldier, I would ensure a longer life, even with the burden of knowing the pain and suffering millions went through because of me.

    Although my surviving is important to me, the fact that my family would survive is much more important. If I was a Jew in the Holocaust I know I would have almost no chance of living, but there is an even better chance that my family dies, as Elie’s father died because of how sick he became through their journey (Wiesel 106). It would be hard enough for me to endure the immense amount of pain that the Jews went through, but seeing my family going through it also would be too much for me to bear.

    The opposition states that they would never be able to live with the fact that they caused the deaths of millions of people, the Jews will never have any regrets of what they have done, and they will value life more after the holocaust is over. However, Jews would not be able to value life more or not have any regrets if they were not alive, and knowing that all of my actions while being a German soldier were not my choice, and I absolutely had to do what I was told under any and all circumstances would help me get through all of my life following the holocaust. I know it was not the Germans choice who they killed or who lived, they had to kill nearly everyone, like on page 27 when the guard screamed to everyone, “men to the left! Women to the right,” they were given directions to give this order, it wasn’t their idea to do this. If it was my choice I know I would do what was right, but my thoughts on what I thought was right would matter to Hitler about as much as the dirt on his shoes.

    In conclusion, I would chose to be a German soldier because even though what I was doing was inhumane and unjust, I would know what I was doing was wrong and my family would be safe at all times.

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  68. Clare Sweeney 12 period

    It is important to have an understanding of the Holocaust because millions of innocent people were murdered. Eleven million people should not have been killed between 1933 and 1945. I would rather have been a prisoner in the concentration camps because so many people’s lives were ended or devastated, I would not be able to live with myself if I were a German soldier, and killing is wrong no matter what.
    Concentration camps not only took numerous people’s lives, but also changed the survivor’s lives forever by killing their families/ friends and giving them unforgettable memories. Even people that weren’t Jewish, or ones that could pose as non-Jews, had so many of their loved ones taken away from them. From Elie Wiesel’s statement, “I was a body,” it is shown that regardless of what happened, the prisoner’s lives would be affected forever. (Wiesel 50).
    If I was a German solider during the Holocaust, I could never forgive myself. Knowing that I was putting a countless number of people through so much agony and unhappiness every minute would tear me apart. I could never say, “Men to the left, and women to the right,” knowing what would happen to them, without hating myself. (Wiesel 27).
    The opposition states that the Jews and others deserved to die because they weren’t of the Aryan race. However, killing is wrong no matter what. Homicide is against the law and most religions. Early on, one of Elie’s neighbors said, “What can we expect?” “It’s war.” (Wiesel 4).
    In conclusion, we have to prevent the world from making the same mistakes it made in the past.

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  69. BRIAN WEBNER

    The Holocaust was one of the biggest human exterminations in history. The Germans believed that they were superior to the Jews and tried to eliminate the Jews off the face of the earth. When asked the question of would I rather be a German soldier or a Jewish prisoner I came to the conclusion that I would rather be a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp.

    One of the reasons some of the Jewish people were able to survive the concentration camps was their strong faith. In the book Elie tells about how many people prayed. On the first day in the camp he heard many Jewish prisoners reciting Jewish prayers. People prayed all the time and kept their faith in God above all else in the camps.

    At the end of the Holocaust, the Germans were defeated. Many German officers that were at the head of concentration camps were killed for their war crimes. The men that were not killed had to live with the fact that they killed 6,000,000 people over the course of the Holocaust. There are some officers that live in America today that were officers in the concentration camps. Every day they think about how many people died under their command.

    The Germans were very hard on the Jewish people. A German officer could kill hundreds of Jews in seconds with different ways of torture. Gas chambers would be the worst in my opinion. German officers witnessed hundreds of Jews fall dead from suffocation from the gas. The death march would also be hard to put myself through. The men and woman on the trips became like animals, not humans "We were masters of nature, masters of the world. We had forgotten everything-death, fatigue, our natural needs. Stronger than cold or hunger, stronger than the shots and the desire to die, condemned and wandering, mere numbers, we were the only men on earth" (Wiesel 83). When Jews had no strength left the Germans kept pushing them, "We were all going to die here. All limits had been passed. No one had any strength left..." (Wiesel 98). What the Germans did to the Jews was inhumane.

    The opposition states it would be better to be a German officer. During the time of the Holocaust, German officers enjoyed high living conditions, with praise from other Nazis. Some German officers got away with their crimes and never thought about them ever again. While I believe Jews got thought the concentration camps by faith, there are some who lost their faith in camp," I did not deny God's existence, but I doubted His absolute justice" (Wiesel 42).

    In conclusion I disagree with German rule, and think being a Jewish slave would have been easier to live with morally, more faithfully rewarding, and have the reward of freedom at the end of the war.

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  70. Luke Latsko- 12th period
    Because the holocaust was such a horrible and terrifying even it should never be lost of forgotten. Over six million Jews, homosexuals, gypsies and non-Aryans were killed in the holocaust and it was probably the darkest time in our history. If I was in the holocaust I probably would have been a twenty year old male Jewish prisoner. I would be this because I don’t think I could ever live with the thought of killing all of those poop innocent people that had no reason for being there other than for their religion. My God, Lord of the Universe, give me strength said Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor (Wiesel 87).
    Being a Jew in the camp would have been better than being a camp officer because a Jewish prisoner would never regret anything and an officer would have to live with the thought of killing millions of people. As you look back at the camp officials I believe some of them knew what they were doing was wrong and just did not want to die by showing kindness. Some official might just have been in the wrong place at the wrong time.
    As you were tortured, beaten, and giving enough food just to get you past starvation you would cherish everything in life even a piece of fruit. If you were a German soldier you would cherish money or other objects.” O God, Lord of the Universe, take pity on us Thy great mercy…” said Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor (Wiesel 17). Our first act as free men was to through ourselves onto the provisions. “We thought not of our revenge, not of our family’s, but of the bread and food” said Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor (Wiesel 109). So overall being a Jewish prisoner would have been better than being a German soldier because they have nothing to regret and they would cherish much more than everyone else.

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  71. Nick Shreve
    1st

    The holocaust was a brutal time in history that everyone would just like to forget but we cannot. We cannot forget because we must remember all of those people who died and we don’t want history to repeat it. During this time I think that I would much rather be a prisoner in the concentration camp rather than a SS officer. As an officer life would be hard after the war.
    As a SS officer after the war it would be hard to go through the rest of my life with everyone hating you. Everywhere you went you would hate and treated with disrespect even if you were forced against your will to do all of the bad things that you have done. Elie Wiesel a survivor during the holocaust said that the hatred for the officers because of all of the brutality (Wiesel 55)
    When you are a prisoner you witness all of the violence but afterwards you can say that you did not commit a crime. The SS officers have to go through life knowing that they have killed innocent people and it would haunt them throughout the rest of their life. Elie Wiesel a survivor of the holocaust said that they were going to hang a young boy and that all of the officers were more worried than ever during that role call (Wiesel 64). Now all of these officers have to go through life know that they killed that innocent little boy.
    The other side would say that they would rather be an officer so they would live. You still have a chance at living as a prisoner. Even if you die I would rather die with respect and with faith rather than with a big burden on my chest. Elie Wiesel a survivor during the holocaust said that after his father’s death everything no longer mattered (Wiesel 113). This was his grievance.
    In conclusion, I would rather be prisoner in camps than an officer because if you die you die with respect rather than living as an officer and having to deal with it your whole life.

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  72. Elizabeth Hackett- 10th Period

    The Holocaust is one of the biggest and worst events in history because millions of people were tortured and killed because of Hitler and it is and event in history that will never be forgotten. If I had a part in the Holocaust and had to choose between being a German soldier with a high society lifestyle or a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps, I would choose to be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps. I would chose to be in this position because the Jewish prisoners were innocent, they were not responsible for the deaths of millions of people, and they were not one of the causes of the WWII.

    I would rather be a Jewish prisoner is because I would be innocent and not live the rest of their lives with the guilt of killing and torturing millions of people. An example from the book, Night by Elie Wiesel is when they are forced to travel in dangerous weather and if they slow down, a German soldier will kill them (Wiesel 81). I would not want to live the rest of my life with that guilt so that is one of the reasons why I would rather be a German soldier.

    The next reason I would rather be a Jewish prisoner is that the Jewish prisoners were not responsible for the deaths of millions of people. An example from the book, Night by Elie Wiesel is when Elie is trying to save his father from death (Wiesel 100). I would not want to be responsible for those deaths, so that is another reasons why I would rather be a Jewish prisoner.

    The opposition states that the German soldiers were not the only ones who caused WWII. However, they are one of the largest causes of WWII. An example from the book, Night by Elie Wiesel is that Hitler was the only person who kept his promises (Wiesel 77). The Jewish prisoners did not have an agenda thus their hands were clean. The German soldiers were following Hitler and they knew that their actions were wrong. The Jewish prisoners were not involved in WWII at all until the German soldiers took them away from their homes to the concentration camps and that is the most important reason why I would rather be a Jewish prisoner.

    In conclusion, I would rather be a Jewish prisoner because I would not want a part in the war.

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  73. Emily Garrett
    12th period

    The Holocaust was a tragic time for many people and it is important that it is never forgotten. If I was involved in the Holocaust, I would like to be a German doctor. Even though being a Jew, I would not have to kill anyone, being a doctor I would not have to kill anyone and I would be less likely to die myself.

    As a German, I would not have to go through unbearable circumstances just to hope to live. I would be able to help people and make it more bearable for them to live. When Elie needed his operation, the doctor was very kind to him and was very helpful (Wiesel 75).

    A German would have adequate food, water and housing. A German would have to yell at some of the sick to enforce fear in them (Wiesel 103). But a German doctor would pass selection because they received more food to help those less fortunate (Wiesel 66).

    The opposition states that a Jew would not regret their actions or kill anyone. However, a Jew could die of starvation, freezing, disease, beatings and over working. A German would not have to worry about that if they did their job. A doctor may not be able to help someone but, at least they could try. A German would have more rights and freedoms and be able to live like a human rather than livestock.

    In conclusion, being a German doctor would be better than being a Jewish prisoner because, you would be able to help people but also know that your life is safe.

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  74. MacKenzie Bates-12th Period
    Books, movies, TV shows, pictures, every form of artistic expression has tried to show the horrors that occurred during the holocaust, but none will ever be able to capture what happened, it cannot be expressed, it can barely even be imagined and it shall never be forgotten. I would never be able to do such atrocities to another human being; I would rather be a Jewish prisoner. I could never blindly follow a madman’s orders, to kill millions of innocent people for unjust reasons.
    How could you follow a person who you have never met before and who asks you to kill thousands of people? You couldn’t, well you shouldn’t. A normal person’s train of thought would have been to ask why, to ask what have they done, but these questions were asked to late. To blindly obey and follow someone you have never met before, is unreasonable and not smart, but when it involves killing millions of people, it is madness and unacceptable.
    Along with blindly following, how could you kill someone who has never done anything wrong, who has just lived their life, who you have never met before? All the person did was be their self, follow their beliefs, do what they were taught from their ancestors, they did nothing wrong; the German’s unjust reasoning was shown when the soldier without emotion told women to go to the right, where they would soon die (Wiesel 27). One of the beauties of this world is that no one is the same, everyone is different in some way, but the holocaust was a fight against the individual, if you weren’t exactly what they wanted, then you died.
    The opposition states that their life was more important. However no life is more important than another, a life is a life. The novel Night written by Elie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor, states, "'Do you see that chimney over there? See it? Do you see those flames? (Yes, we did see the flames.) Over there-that's where you're going to be taken. That's your grave, over there.'"(Wiesel 28) I would rather suffer and die in a concentration camp than wrongfully take another person’s life. In Night, Elie Wiesel, the author, writes, “How could I forget that concert, given to an audience of dying and dead men!”(Wiesel 97).
    In conclusion, I would much rather be a Jewish prisoner than be a part of the largest genocide known to mankind.

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  75. Caitlyn Sharick 6th Period

    The Holocaust was one of the greatest atrocities committed against the Jewish people. A German officer would have a preferable lifestyle because they were not treated like the Jewish prisoners who were tortured, starved, and killed. A German officer was forced to treat the Jewish prisoners harshly, but could secretly try to treat the Jewish prisoners with more dignity in private.
    The Jewish people saw horrible crimes committed against their families and their fellowman which made them question if there was a God. “Where is merciful God,” said a man in the concentration camp (Wiesel 65). Wiesel had lost his faith in God with the horrible treatment of his people. Although the German officers were forced to watch unspeakable crimes, they went on with their lives.
    Crimes that were committed against the Jews were the extraction of gold from their teeth, public whippings until they were left unconscious, and innocent babies thrown into boilers. Extermination of Jewish people was the goal of Hitler. “Never shall I forget the little faces of the children, whose bodies I saw turned into wreaths of smoke beneath a silent blue sky,” Wiesel said on page 34.
    The opposition states that being a Jewish prisoner would be a better choice than a German officer because of what the officers were forced to do to the prisoners. War is only survival for both prisoners and officers. As horrible as war is, an officer could go on to live his life, have a family, and possibly make a difference in the world once the war was over.
    In conclusion, the Holocaust will never be forgotten by the Jewish people because of the mass genocide of over six million Jews. Jewish people were treated inhumanely and forced to witness horrible crimes against innocent men, women and children. “From the depths of the mirror, a corpse was contemplating me. The look in his eyes as he gazed at me has never left me,” said Ellie Wiesel, a Holocaust survivor (Wiesel 115). Adolf Hitler and the Nazi’s not only murdered Jews, but took their dignity, their beliefs, and their souls.

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  76. Sam DiCecco

    Some people have been wondering lately if it would have been better to be a Jewish prisoner during the holocaust or a German soldier. I think that people should prefer to have been a prisoner during the holocaust for many reasons. The prisoners still had family and friends around them to support them as best they could, for the most part. After the holocaust, those who survived were treated far better, while the Germans were treated as monsters. Finally, even though their conditions were worse, they at least were able to maintain their humanity, something the Germans could not do.
    The prisoners were still united as a group, and had family and friends around them to help keep themselves together. While many looked out for themselves, others were more than happy to help there Jewish brothers keep living. This quote, “Bite your lip, little brother....Keep your anger and hatred for another day, for later on. The day will come, but not now....Wait. Grit your teeth and wait....” (Wiesel 51) was said in Elie Wiesel’s book, Night, by a girl who was comforting Elie and proves that compassion still existed.
    Though many died, the prisoners who lived through the Holocaust were once again given good lives. They were helped to once again become a strong people, while the world was angry at the Germans evil. This quote, "We were masters of nature, masters of the world. We had forgotten everything-death, fatigue, our natural needs. Stronger than cold or hunger, stronger than the shots and the desire to die, condemned and wandering, mere numbers, we were the only men on earth," (Wiesel 83) shows how happy it was when they were freed.
    The opposition states that the Germans had a much better lifestyle than the prisoners. However, to do so they had to give up all traces of humanity they still had, just to live a little better, but the prisoners were still good people through it all. This quote, "Eight words spoken quietly, indifferently, without emotion. Eight short, simple words. Yet that was the moment when I parted from my mother," (Wiesel 27) shows how emotionless the Germans were when they killed Elie’s mother.
    In conclusion, I believe it is much better to be a prisoner during the holocaust then to make others suffer so much pain.

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  77. Margaret Nakles- 12th period
    From about 1933-1945, a demoralizing event, where millions of Jews were killed, was the Holocaust. If you were to choose between being a Jewish prisoner or a German soldier, you should choose to be a Jewish prisoner. Even though the Jews were tortured beyond belief, you should choose to be a prisoner because it would be so hard to live with yourself if you had to torture innocent Jews, you would want to stand up for and survive for what you believe in, and also so you would be able to share your story with the future generations like Elie Wiesel did.

    If you were a German officer, you were told to kill innocent Jews in torturous ways. It would be terrible to have to do that, and if you were the least bit nice to them, it had to be done in secret, like the person who changed Elie’s age so he wouldn’t be burned in the crematory with the children (Wiesel 28). Being a Jewish prisoner would spare you from having to live with yourself knowing it was you who helped killed millions of blameless Jews.

    By being a Jew in the concentration camps, you were given the chance to stand up and do all you could to survive for all that you believe in. Jews were obviously sent to the camps because they were Jewish, so you had to fight for survive for your own faith and identity. Throughout the story, Elie talked about how you had to keep and not let go of your faith to survive (Wiesel 72).

    The opposition states that choosing to be a German officer is the more satisfying life. However, being a Jewish prisoner is the better way to go in the long run. By being a Jewish prisoner, you are given the opportunity to spread the word about your knowledge of being tormented and surviving through the Holocaust to the future generations. After reading Night, and listening to Gita Frankel speak to us about her experience, the importance of never forgetting became very clear. Towards the end, mostly, Gita Frankel really emphasized how important “never forgetting” really is, so we will not make the same mistake again (Gita Frankel March 12, 2009).

    In conclusion, if you had to choose between being a Jewish prisoner or a German officer, you should choose to be a Jewish prisoner due to having to live with yourself if you helped kill millions or guiltless Jews, being able to stand up and fight to survive for what you believe in, and having the chance to tell your story to the upcoming generations so they will never forget.

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  78. Daniel Konyk
    10th period

    A very controversial question about the holocaust is; would you rather live a high society lifestyle or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps? It would be better to be a prisoner because it would be the most right thing to do, because the things that German soldiers would do to the Jew’s is inhumane, they worked in terrible conditions, and they would be remembered very badly.
    Although the prisoners had it really bad at the camps, the soldiers didn’t have it extremely easy. The soldiers would have to work in hard conditions. A quote from the book, (Weisel26) “In the air, it smelled of burning flesh.”
    A lot of the things that the Nazi soldiers did were very inhumane. Many things that the Nazi soldiers did were so cruel and nobody had even thought that humans were capable of doing such inhumane things to others. (Weisel30) “I did not believe that they could burn people in our age, that humanity would never tolerate it…” Eli even witnessed (Weisel30) “Babies yes I saw it with my own eyes…those children in those flames.”
    The opposition states that life would be better living the higher lifestyle as a Nazi soldier, but they were remembered as very badly to others, and some were persecuted. After the holocaust all of the survivors wanted to make sure that no body forgot about how cruel the Nazis were. As told by a Mrs. Frankels, a holocaust survivor, the day after liberation any Germans were allowed to be killed.
    In conclusion, although the prisoners faced many hardships and were close to death in the camps, it is still better to be them then to do the inhumane things that the Nazi soldiers did.

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  79. Vero Rodriguez-10th period

    Our class has just finished reading the book “Night” by Elie Wiesel. We were all asked whether we would rather be a German soldier and live a high society life style or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps. I would much rather be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps. I don’t think that I could ever hurt anyone like the Germans soldier did, I would like to be part of the group that everyone knows could have changed the world by helping it, and I would want to be able to represent the Jewish population.
    If I were a German soldier I don’t think that I could ever live with my life knowing that I discriminated and killed a group for no reason, except for the one that I was ordered to. “Never shall I forget that night..” said Elie Wiesel of his first night in camp (Wiesel 32), and I would hate knowing that if I were a soldier I made many prisoners think that thought every night from all the murders and pain that they witnessed. German soldiers ruined the lives of those who experienced the Holocaust and anyone who experiences that will have to live with it forever and never be able to forget about all the horrible things that happened.
    The Jewish were a very smart and educated group, who did everything that everyone else did such as own shops, go to school, and work in normal jobs like anyone else would. Even Elie Wiesel said “My parents ran a shop…. As for me, they said my place was at school.”(Wiesel 2), which showed that his family was similar to most of the others even if they had a different religion. Maybe one of the many millions of Jewish that died could have figured out the cure for one of the many diseases, or they could have even changed the way we see the world, but we will never know because they were discriminated against and killed.
    The opposition states that they (German Soldiers) were just trying to protect their country and support it by doing what their leader ordered. However, I would want to be a Jewish prisoner because if I was Jewish I would be able to represent my population and be able to show pride in what I believe in. “And, the essential thing, don’t be afraid!” said the head of Elie Wiesel’s block (Wiesel 67) and that would be something that I would have to accomplish, to not be afraid. I would take whatever was given to me, because while I was in pain I would be representing all those who’ve already died, the ones that soon will, and the survivors that would tell me story and everyone else’s.
    In conclusion, I would want to be a Jewish prisoner in a concentration camp in order to be able to represent one of the many millions killed in the Holocaust.

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  80. Brooke Sudina-1st Period
    Would you rather be a German soldier and live a high society lifestyle or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps? Personally, I would rather be a Jew in the concentration camps. The Germans were terrible people for what they did killing millions of innocent human beings. I would not be able to live with myself knowing that I had killed hundreds of people. If I was a Jew I would have led a better life than the Germans, and I would rather walk the March of Death as a Jew then be someone inhumane.
    If I was a Jewish person I would probably end up living a better life than the Germans have. A Jewish person could move on with their life after the Holocaust unlike the Germans who would have to live with the guilt; like some of the others that felt bad during the Holocaust (Wiesel 48). The Jews that have survived the Holocaust moved on with their lives, got jobs, and educations; if the Germans had not killed all the other millions of Jews there would be many more people with jobs and maybe different jobs we don’t have now.
    If I was a German I would not be able to live with myself knowing that I had killed hundreds of people. I would live in guilt for my whole life; knowing that I had burned, suffocated, or beat someone to death (Wiesel 59-60). The Germans were bad for what they did and hopefully have realized their wrong ways and have tried to make up for it.
    The opposition states that the Germans to live a good life and that they had plenty of food and did not burn or starve to death, however I would rather walk the march of Death rather than easing through it because I was a German. I would rather stand up for my race like the Jews did in the book when they prayed even when things were bad (Wiesel 33). The Jews stayed together and stood up for what they thought was right; they lived through the torture the Germans gave them. When the Germans got to breeze through anything and will never know what its like to live through something so bad that you lose everyone in your family.
    In conclusion being a Jew would be better because they lived through all the torture and pain of the Germans and learned how inhumane some others can be. Never forget.

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  81. Tyler Robertson Period 12
    Argument Paper

    What would I rather be, A German soldier during WWII, or a Jewish prisoner? I would rather be the German soldier. I wouldn’t be subject to the fires and mistreatment, I would have plenty to eat, and I would be helping restore my country to greatness.
    If I were a German soldier, I wouldn’t be mistreated. In Night, Elie’s mother and sisters are thrown into crematory fires, and Elie and his father are mistreated and live in horrible conditions. (Wiesel, 31) As a German soldier, I would live in a normal bunk, and I wouldn’t be thrown into fires.
    As a German soldier, I would receive enough food to eat. In Night Elie and his father, as well as the other prisoners, are malnourished and never have enough to eat. (Wiesel, 57) Being a German soldier, they would feed me so I would be at full strength.
    The opposition states that it would be morally just to be a Jewish prisoner under German occupation. However, I would just be a normal German soldier working as a medic on the Eastern Front, helping my fellow soldiers, and easing them of their suffering, while the SS officers committed the said atrocities on the Jewish people. (Wiesel, 61) I would not be involved in the genocide whatsoever, and I would actually be against it, but I would’ve been drafted, like many of my fellow soldiers. I would feel morally right just because of my job helping people.
    In conclusion, I would be a German soldier during WWII.

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  82. Zach Scott
    1

    The Holocaust was one of the most horrible dark times in the worlds history. It is absolutely incomprehensible to think that human beings could behave toward other human beings the way the Nazis behaved to their prisinors. That being said, I would prefer to be a German in the concentration camps to being a prisinor. As a German, there would have been an opportunity to offer some comfort, however small, as well as have slightly more control over my fate in the camp, whereas the Jews would have been in no position to be able to offer help to anyone.
    As a German in the camp, I would be able to offer some small assistance or comfort to the sufferring prisinors, something that they themselves were clearly unable to do. I could ease their suffering in any way, by any small word or kindess, like the doctor comforting Elie (Wiesel 80). The Jews were in absolutely no way able to help themselves or anyone else, as they were faced treatment even harsher than normal for showing compassion to one another.
    Many of the Germans were serving under threat to their own families and/or blackmail. Even if they objected to the way that the Jews were being treated, as everyone most definately should have, there was no way they could have spoken out without a threat to them and their families. In this sense, noone had the right to step up and say anything. The most that the Germans could do would be to offer what little help they could. It was easier for the Germans to ease the suffering of the Jews in some way than it was for the Jews themselves however, because of the difference in the way they were treated. As a German, your moves were not monitered every second, so it was relatively easy to wait until noone was watching to perform some small act of kindness. The Jews on the other hand, were under constant survailence, with a gun help on them form the moment they got there (Wiesel 30). Thus there was almost no way for the Jews to help each other, and the Germans had evert opportunity to.
    Opposers to this view will say that they wouldn't be Germans because what the Germans did was inherently wrong, and this is absolutely true. However, they are reading far more into the question than I am. I am simply saying that at that moment in time, in those desperate moments in the concentration camps, I would choose to be in the situation that allowed me to help in some way. I would pick the position that gave me the oportunity to ease the burden in whatever way I could, like the Blockalteste advising the inamates on how to pass the selection (Wiesel 71). Given the choice between utterly restricted freedom, and only slightly restriced, I would choose the scenario where I still felt like I had at least some semblence of control over my own fate.
    In conclusion, what the Nazis did was reprehensible, terrible, and wrong. It should in no way be accepted or forgotten. Elie Wiesel is right when he says "If we forget, we are guilty" (Wiesel 119). If I was a part of those dark times, I would choose the role that allowed me to give comfort, or hope, in any way, however small. I also choose to have some control, or at least a feeling of control over what I did. In short, I choose my freedom of will and the ablilty to help.

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  83. Emily Parnell
    10.

    When I was asked if I would rather be German soldier and live a high society lifestyle or be a Jewish prisoner in the concentration camps I knew exactly what my answer would be and without a doubt I would rather to be a Jewish prisoner. Its true that life was much better for the German Soldiers but I would much rather be killed, then kill anyone. The German Soldiers didn’t care about the babies and didn’t care about the bodies, I would much prefer to be a Jewish prisoner then to be cause of any of the millions of deaths that took place of innocent people during the Holocaust.

    When I remember Elie’s story, and all of the triadic things him and millions of others had to witness, and go through, all I can’t think of is pain. "Was there a single place here where you were not in danger of death?" said Elie Wiesel a survior of the holocaust[Wiesel 37], If there are people out there who can live with themselves after murdering one person, let alone millions then I don’t think they are human. If I had to be a German, I would rather die then take the life of any innocent person!

    "We were all going to die here. All limits had been passed. No one had any strength left. And again the night would be long." said Elie Wiesel a holocaust survivor [Wiesel 98],I think that must have been going through every single prisoner’s mind at one point. When you witness something so tragic you can never forget, never think the same again. And Being a soldier and putting people in gas chambers and in the crematories is the worst thing in the world, to not show sympathy, or regret is sad.

    The oppositions states that being a German Soldier would be “better” because of the high lifestyle, however is murdering innocent people really a “lifestyle”, let alone a better one. “From the depths of the mirror, a corpse gazed back at me. The look in his eyes, as they stared into mine, has never left me” Elie Wiesel, holocaust survivor once said[Wiesel 109], having that memory engraved in your mind that was left by a German soldier is something that can never be forgiven.

    In conclusion I strongly believe being a Jewish prisoner is a better decision. Hitler was responsible for the the deaths of an estimated around 6 million Jews and millions of other people who did not fit the Aryan mold. The holocaust is never to be forgotten, never.

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  84. Erin Emery 12th period (resent, you wanted to check the citations, there are 3)

    During the Holocaust, there were two very important positions including a German soldier, or a Jew. I would choose to be neither because I would rather be a secret German soldier who would truly be for the safety of the Jews, and help as many as I could. Three reasons for my stance would be because German soldiers killed Jews and were too harsh, Jews were vulnerable and not treated well, and if I could not prevent war I could at least help one person at a time.

    During the war and in the concentration camps, the German soldiers made it their duty to kill as many Jews as possible. Weisel could not believe that they could burn people in his age (Wiesel 30). "I'm going to run to the electric wire. That would be better than slow agony in the flames," (Wiesel 31).

    As the war started, Jews were taken from their homes, their belongings, and their lives. Upon arriving at concentration camps, many were killed on the spot, and many had to work nonstop until they were killed. Jews were brutally treated without even knowing what they did to deserve it.

    The opposition states that helping one person at a time will not even make a dent on the lasting effects of war. However, I believe that if I help a Jew, or even save their life, than they will pay it forward and help someone else. This process will make a difference and more Jews will be saved. Gita Frankel said that the woman who let her stay with her mother, was the most compassionate person to her during her time in concentration camps.

    In conclusion, I believe that one person can make even the slightest of difference in a lasting effect.

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  85. KELLY O'CONNOR
    12th period

    The Holocaust was a horrible event, but it should never be forgotten. If I had to be a Jewish prisoner or a German officer I pick to be a Jewish prisoner. Some examples why is first they didn’t have to live with the guilt of killing anyone, I know it would be hard but they would probably go to heaven. My last reason is because if I were to survive then I could tell the horrible stories and promote world peace.
    Living in the concentration camps was extremely hard. The Jews went through horrible times but the German officers had to go through all the horrible feelings of killing people. At the time they probably didn’t care but after they had to deal with the regret and guilt. Personally I couldn’t deal with killing other humans. I know that one of the Ten Commandments is “Thou shall not kill” and I couldn’t bare to live with myself taking another life. Even though the bobs would be hitting thousands it wouldn’t hurt as much as just one” (Wiesel 57). It was probably scary to have to see so many dead, but it was probably worse seeing a load of dead people and knowing you caused that.
    The Jewish people that got killed in the camps that didn’t lose faith hopefully went to heaven. A lot of Jewish people were wondering where god had gone and why he had abandoned them. The German soldiers had probably lost all faith and that’s another reason why I couldn’t be one. To live with such a weight on your solders has got to be hard. You can’t give up on your faith and you must resist death (Wiesel 97). For the Jewish people they have become closer with God for suffering like he did.
    Not a lot of Jewish people made it through the Holocaust. A handful of people did and most of them went on to be successful people. The last reason why I would rather be a Jewish prisoner is because if I were to make it through I could fight for human peace. For people to be aware about the holocaust it will help people to understand why all people should be equal. You cannot give up on God or your faith or you will surrender and loose (Wiesel 97). If I were to get through it I would help people with this quote. Even as hard as life is I would help people understand you can’t lose faith and you have to keep going.
    In conclusion, being a Jewish prisoner in fact was better than being a German soldier. The holocaust was one of the worst events in history, but shall never be forgotten.

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